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Whipped Body Butter: Homemade Lotion Is Just a Few Simple Steps Away

Health + Wellness

Through living a zero waste lifestyle, I have learned to make all of my everyday beauty products myself. This has resulted in a much more minimalistic approach to my daily beauty routine. Instead of having 20+ products, I now only use five that I make by hand: one bar of soap for my hair, body and face, toothpaste, deodorant, face moisturizer and body moisturizer. My recipes have changed over time as I learned to be more confident trying new ingredients and techniques. No other product showcases this evolution more than my zero waste body butter.

For a long time I used nothing but coconut oil on my body which worked really well and smelled great, but I missed the sensation of a thick lotion. That is when I started playing around with body butters which are thicker than just using an oil because of the diversity of fats in them.

At first I made a simple one of coconut oil, shea butter and cocoa butter by melting them down and cooling them in the freezer. It worked, but I had to use my nail at times to scrape it and sometimes the shea butter would bead up which wasn't as nice as a smooth lotion. Then I learned of the magic of whipping a body lotion and it changed the game for me. It went from a thick oil to a luxurious whipped butter.

It could not be easier to make and at the end you can store it in your favorite upcycled glass jar making this not only a sustainable product because of the simple organic ingredients, but a waste free one too! Learn how to make this lotion by checking out my video here:

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