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Which States Made The Top 10 For LEED-Certified Green Buildings?

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Some states simply have a flair for energy efficient buildings, lower carbon emissions and everything else that characterizes green building. The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) recognized them today by releasing its ranking of the top 10 states for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) projects.

In 2013, 1,777 commercial and institutional projects in the top 10 states earned LEED certification. Those structures represent 226.8 million square feet of real estate.  

“The list of the Top 10 States for LEED is a continuing indicator of the widespread recognition of our national imperative to create healthier, high-performing buildings that are better for the environment as well as the people who use them every day,” said Rick Fedrizzi, president, CEO and founding chair of the USGBC.

“As the economy recovers, green buildings continue to provide for jobs at every professional level and skill set from carpenters to architects. I congratulate everyone in these states whose contributions to resources saved, toxins eliminated, greenhouse gases avoided and human health enhanced help guarantee a prosperous future for our planet and the people who call it home.”

Table credit: U.S. Green Building Council

With Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. each cracking the top 10, the Mid-Atlantic region dominated in 2013. Illinois comfortably secured first place by certifying more than 29 million square footage for 171 projects.

“Both the public and private sectors in Illinois recognize that long-term investments in 21st century infrastructure should be done in ways that reduce energy consumption and protect the environment,” Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn said. “Illinois is proud to be the nation’s green buildings leader and we are proof that a smaller environmental footprint can help us step toward energy independence.”     

Some of the notable LEED-certified projects in the top 10 states include:

  • Illinois: The Illinois Holocaust Museum in Skokie, LEED Gold.
  • Maryland: M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, LEED Gold, home of the Baltimore Ravens.
  • New York: Barclays Center in Brooklyn, LEED Silver, home of the Brooklyn Nets and future home of the N.Y. Islanders.
  • California: SFJAZZ Center in San Francisco, LEED Gold.
  • North Carolina: Mother Earth Brewing in Kinston, LEED Gold.
  • Hawaii: Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa in Kapolei, LEED Silver, the largest certified project in the state.

The U.S. green building industry could be worth nearly $250 billion by 2016, according to McGraw-Hill Construction. The USGBC released LEED v4—the organization’s updated green building program—in November.

There are more than 20,000 LEED-certified projects worldwide representing 2.9 billion square feet of space, according to the USGBC. There are another 37,000 projects representing 7.6 billion square feet in the certification pipeline.

Visit EcoWatch’s GREEN BUILDING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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