Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Which Cooking Oils Are the Healthiest?

Food
Which Cooking Oils Are the Healthiest?

If you’re confused about which cooking oil to use, you’re not alone. Different organizations claim different oils to be the healthiest.

I want to clear the confusion and share with you the best oils for cooking, according to science. But first realize that all cooking oils are high in calories—a teaspoon has about 120 calories, so consume them in moderation, if you’re trying to lose weight.

The two important things to consider when choosing cooking oil are the smoking point and ratio of omega-6 to omega-3s.

The two important things to consider when choosing cooking oil are the smoking point and ratio of omega-6 to omega-3s.

The smoking point of oil is the temperature at which oil starts to emit smoke. Oils with low smoking points should be avoided.

And make sure you choose oils with good ratio of omega 6 to omega 3s. A ratio of 2:1 or lower is preferable. Higher ratios have been linked to inflammation, cardiovascular diseases and other diseases.

Below, are the best cooking oils for your health.

1. Coconut Oil

Coconut oil has a high smoking point and is known to have numerous health benefits. Some folks may avoid it due to high levels of saturated fats, but study after study has proven that saturated fats are not bad for your health.

When buying coconut oil, choose virgin coconut oil, which has high amounts of antioxidants and it tastes great.

2. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Olive oil has many health benefits, in fact research shows that extra virgin olive oil prevents cancer cells from spreading in the body.

Some believe that olive oil is not fit for cooking because of low smoking point but studies show that it has a smoking point fit for cooking.

3. Almond Oil

Almond oil isn’t just good for your skin, it can also be used for cooking. It contains high levels of monounsaturated fats and is known to improve cardiovascular health.

Note that some types of almond oil are not fit for consumption. Look for oils labeled, "for culinary use" or "foodgrade."

4. Clarified Butter (Ghee)

The fear of saturated fats has made many people avoid butter. But research shows that processed margarine is the problem, not real butter.

Real butter has a low smoking point so it’s best you use ghee. Which is also good for folks who are intolerant to lactose.

5. Avocado Oil

Avocado oil has a smoking point higher than any other plant oil (520 degrees). So it can be used in high heat cooking like pan-roasting or grilling. In fact, avocado oil can be consumed cold, so feel free to add it to salads and soups.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

12 Awesome Ways to Use Avocados

Why You Should Drink Oolong Tea

8 Tips for a Successful Detox

4 Things That Can Happen If You Quit Eating Dairy

A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

President of the European Investment Bank Werner Hoyer holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium on Jan. 30, 2020. Dursun Aydemir / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

By Jon Queally

Noted author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben was among the first to celebrate word that the president of the European Investment Bank on Wednesday openly declared, "To put it mildly, gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts and economists have been saying for years if not decades.

Read More Show Less

A dwarf giraffe is seen in Uganda, Africa. Dr. Michael Brown, GCF

Nine feet tall is gigantic by human standards, but when researcher and conservationist Michael Brown spotted a giraffe in Uganda's Murchison Falls National Park that measured nine feet, four inches, he was shocked.

Read More Show Less
Kelsey Mueller, 16, pets Ruby while waiting with her family to be escorted from the evacuation zone at the Shaver Lake Marina parking lot off of CA-168 during the Creek Fire on Sept. 7, 2020 in Shaver Lake, California. Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Daisy Simmons

In a wildfire, hurricane, or other disaster, people with pets should heed the Humane Society's advice: If it isn't safe for you, it isn't safe for your animals either.

Read More Show Less