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When and Where to See the Super-Rare Supermoon Lunar Eclipse

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When and Where to See the Super-Rare Supermoon Lunar Eclipse

There will be a supermoon lunar eclipse this Sunday Sept. 27 and if you miss it, your next chance won't be until 2033. According to Discovery News, it's a "confluence of three events: a full moon; a lunar eclipse, in which the Earth blocks the sun's light from hitting the moon; and lunar perigee, when the moon is in the closest part of its orbit to Earth."


The last time this happened was in 1982, and it only happened a total of five times in the 20th century. Now that's pretty rare. People in the Americas, Europe, Africa, western Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean will all have a chance to catch this marvelous event.

Discovery News has the breakdown:

The moon will be shrouded in shadow Sunday night or early Monday morning (depending on the time zone). It will enter the dark part of the Earth's shadow at 9:07 EDT Sunday (0107 GMT), and it will enter a total eclipse by 10:11 p.m. EDT (0211 GMT Monday) before begin[ning] to emerge from shadow 12 minutes later. Areas that cannot see the full eclipse, because sunset comes too late or sunrise too early, may still be able to see part of the moon obscured.

Watch NASA explain the event and why it's going to be so cool:

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