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What's the State of Green Business in 2014?

Business

The "State of Green Business" annual report from GreenBiz.com shows why we have reason to both applaud and criticize the progress companies have made in sustainability.

"What's business as usual today was not that long ago innovative, even breakthrough: Bio-based products, accounting systems that place a realistic value on water and carbon, smart supply chains that optimize transportation and energy, renewable energy that isn't just for show, and more," Joel Makower, the site's chairman and executive editor, said in a summary.

"Now, the bad news ... we're not making much progress. When you actually measure year-on-year progress companies are making, it's a disappointing state of affairs."

Here are eight infographics from the report that illustrate the good and bad.

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GreenBiz.com produces the report on an annual basis with Trucost, which researches and standardizes the environmental practices disclosed by more than 4,600 companies around the world that  represent 93 percent of global markets by market capitalization.

Trucost examined and compared results from the 500 U.S. companies in the Standard & Poor's Index and the MSCI World Index, which covers more than 1,600 companies in 24 developed markets.

"In most cases, the progress is incremental," Makower said. "In some cases, it's flat, or even declining."

View the full report here.

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

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