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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

What’s in Your Paper?

What’s in Your Paper?

You use paper in some form every day, right? But have you stopped to consider what’s in that paper?

Environmental Paper Network (EPN)  was formed in 2001 because concerned people took that question seriously. EPN is a network of 100+ organizations working towards the common goal of a transformational change—to address social justice and conservation—in the expanding forest, pulp and paper industry as described in the Global Paper Vision. This collaboration has helped catalyze significant market shifts, including decreases in U.S. over-consumption and increased use of recovered fiber.

On June 17, EPN asks everyone to ask, “What’s in your paper?” You can join the global conversation and play a part in protecting air, water, forests, climate and communities—and help generate a powerful force for change.

Environmentalist Dayna Reggero, who started out as a spokesperson for endangered species at 19, describes paper as: “One tiny product that is an extraordinary opportunity not only to protect our ancient old growth forests and other forests, but also to protect the climate, clean air, clean water, communities, indigenous peoples.”

Reggero joins the Green Divas to discuss What’s in Your Paper project (as well as 'Years of Living Dangerously,' Woody Harrelson and more).

So why not look before you buy. What’s in that paper? Bleach? Recycled content? Share the hashtag #WhatsInYourPaper June 17 to be a part of the solution and help generate a powerful force for change.

You can also use the paper calculator tool any time to measure the environmental impacts of your paper usage and discover the best paper choices.

 

Tearing through the crowded streets of Philadelphia, an electric car and a gas-powered car sought to win a heated race. One that mimicked how cars are actually used. The cars had to stop at stoplights, wait for pedestrians to cross the street, and swerve in and out of the hundreds of horse-drawn buggies. That's right, horse-drawn buggies. Because this race took place in 1908. It wanted to settle once and for all which car was the superior urban vehicle. Although the gas-powered car was more powerful, the electric car was more versatile. As the cars passed over the finish line, the defeat was stunning. The 1908 Studebaker electric car won by 10 minutes. If in 1908, the electric car was clearly the better form of transportation, why don't we drive them now? Today, I'm going to answer that question by diving into the history of electric cars and what I discovered may surprise you.

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