Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

What Neil Young and Pope Francis Have in Common

Food
What Neil Young and Pope Francis Have in Common

I imagine top executives at Monsanto are not huge fans right now of Neil Young or Pope Francis. The two might seem to lead very disparate lives. One is a life-long Canadian rocker and the other leads a flock of 1.2 billion Catholics. But lately the two have drawn the ire of corporate giants, particularly Monsanto, all over the world.

The two might seem very different, but they have both taken very public stances against GMOs, pesticides and corporate abuse.

Neil Young's album, The Monsanto Years, was released June 29 and it's already causing quite a stir. Ahead of the album's release, Monsanto issued a statement criticizing Neil Young for perpetuating myths about the company.

According to Pitchfork, the album "fixes its crosshairs on the GMO-pimping agribusiness behemoth that has a stranglehold on the world's seed (and, by extension, food) supply, forcing farmers to comply their strict terms or be litigated into destitution." To be fair, Young doesn't just single out Monsanto. He takes on Wal-Mart, Chevron, Citizens United and Starbucks, just to name a few.

Last fall, Young made a very public boycott of Starbucks over its (and Monsanto's) alleged support of the Grocery Manufacturers Association's lawsuit to prevent Vermont from accurately labeling food. In April, a judge upheld Vermont's GMO-labeling law while the case continues.

And unless you've been living in an off-grid community in the middle of nowhere (if so, that's awesome), then you are probably aware that Pope Francis released an encyclical earlier this month. In that encyclical, the religious leader did not mince words when it came to the dire need for immediate action on climate change.

Read page 1

But while his words on climate change might have gotten the most attention, the Pope also is a strong critic of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and pesticides. The week before he released his encyclical, Pope Francis hosted the 39th UN Food and and Agriculture Organization conference at the Vatican. During the conference, the Pontiff took the opportunity to condemn multinational corporations like Monsanto for choosing profits over people.

And in the Pope's encyclical, he denounced pesticides and GMO crops, declaring “the spread of these crops destroys the complex web of ecosystems, decreases diversity in production and affects the present and the future of regional economies.”

At the heart of all of these issues is how the poor and marginalized are adversely affected by problems like climate change, unjust food policies, exposure to toxic pesticides, and the concentration of wealth and land in the hands of a few. Pope Francis and Neil Young are both tirelessly dedicated to putting the needs of the poor and marginalized first and preserving the environment for future generations.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Pope or Kochs: Republicans, Who Do You Stand With?

Q & A With Green Party Presidential Candidate Jill Stein

Think Today’s Refugee Crisis is Bad? Climate Change Will Make it a Lot Worse

A diabolical ironclad beetle. Heather Broccard-Bell / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The aptly named diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) has an exoskeleton so strong, it can survive being pecked by birds and even run over by cars. When early entomologists tried to mount them as specimens, BBC News explained, that exoskeleton would snap or bend their pins.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sun Cable hopes to start construction of the world's largest solar farm in 2023. Sun Cable
A large expanse of Australia's deserted Outback will house the world's largest solar farm and generate enough energy to export power to Singapore, as The Guardian reported.
Read More Show Less

Trending

We pet owners know how much you love your pooch. It's your best friend. It gives you pure happiness and comfort when you're together. But there are times that dogs can be very challenging, especially if they are suffering from a certain ailment. As a dog owner, all you want to do is ease whatever pain or discomfort your best friend is feeling.

Read More Show Less
Construction on the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric station in 2015. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Tara Lohan

In 1999 a cheering crowd watched as a backhoe breached a hydroelectric dam on Maine's Kennebec River. The effort to help restore native fish populations and the river's health was hailed as a success and ignited a nationwide movement that spurred 1,200 dam removals in two decades.

Read More Show Less
A new study has revealed that Earth's biggest mass extinction was triggered by volcanic activity that led to ocean acidification. Illustration by Dawid Adam Iurino (PaleoFactory, Sapienza University of Rome) for Jurikova et al (2020)

The excess carbon dioxide emitted by human activity since the start of the industrial revolution has already raised the Earth's temperature by more than one degree Celsius, increased the risk of extreme hurricanes and wildfires and killed off more than half of the corals in the Great Barrier Reef. But geologic history shows that the impacts of greenhouse gases could be much worse.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch