Quantcast

Web Tool Allows Public Tracking of Oil Spills

Oceana

An oil spill that began Nov. 8—estimated to have released as much as 157,000 gallons per day into Brazil's Campos Basin—is the latest evidence of the dangers of offshore drilling.

This accident is just one of many oil spills that occur each day, and often go unnoticed. Yet, they do extraordinary damage to marine ecosystems. Oceana, in partnership with SkyTruth, has posted a Web-based mapping tool to help inform policymakers and the public about oil spills in U.S. waters. To access this new tool, click here.

SkyTruth automatically compiles and publishes oil spill reports from the National Response Center (NRC), which is data self-reported by the oil industry, the public and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s incident news reports. Because most of the NRC spill reports are filed by the polluters themselves, the number and size of oil spills occurring each day may far exceed even those depicted on the map.

The map highlights spill locations, using satellite imagery to provide as many details as possible. For example, on today’s spill map, we can view the location of a well control line leak approximately 4,000 feet below the Gulf of Mexico surface, on a Chevron well. Like most, this spill has received little attention. From this map, viewers may link to a SkyTruth analysis to learn more about each individual spill.

“This new Web tool will help people visualize the magnitude of the oil industry’s damage to our natural environment and our economy,” said Oceana senior campaign director Jacqueline Savitz. “These spills are often swept under the rug, but the public and policymakers have a right to know how much damage is being done to our oceans. Our work with SkyTruth will help to make that possible,” added Savitz.

"We built SkyTruth Alerts in the wake of the BP disaster, so we could keep track of spills that happen in the Gulf every day. Now we have made it available on the Web so anyone can know about these incidents as soon as we do," said John Amos, founder and president of SkyTruth. "We're thrilled to be working with Oceana, one of the world's leading conservation organizations, to share this tool with everyone who cares about our oceans."

For more information, click here.

—————

Oceana is the largest international advocacy group working solely to protect the world’s oceans. Oceana wins policy victories for the oceans using science-based campaigns. Since 2001, we have protected over 1.2 million square miles of ocean and innumerable sea turtles, sharks, dolphins and other sea creatures. More than 500,000 supporters have already joined Oceana. Global in scope, Oceana has offices in North, South and Central America and Europe. To learn more, visit www.oceana.org

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

"It would be great to see all the candidates join Elizabeth Warren in taking the No Big Ag Money Pledge," said Citizens Regeneration Lobby's Alexis Baden-Mayer. Peter Blanchard / Flickr / ric (CC BY 2.0)

By Andrea Germanos

Food system justice and environmental advocates on Wednesday urged all Democratic presidential hopefuls to follow in the footsteps of Sen. Elizabeth Warren in signing a pledge rejecting campaign cash from food and agribusiness corporations.

Read More
A new study shows the impact Native Americans had on landscapes was "small" compared to what followed by Europeans. The findings provide important takeaway for conservation in New England today, seen above in a view of areas surrounding Rangeley Lakes in Maine. Cappi Thompson / Moment / Getty Images

There's a theory going around that Native Americans actively managed the land the lived on, using controlled burns to clear forests. It turns out that theory is wrong. New research shows that Native Americans barely altered the landscape at all. It was the Europeans who did that, as ZME Science reported.

Read More
Sponsored
Loggers operate in an area of lodgepole pine trees killed by the mountain pine beetle in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest on Sept. 13, 2019 in Montana. As climate change makes summers hotter and drier in the Northern Rockies, forests are threatened with increasing wildfire activity, deadly pathogens and insect infestations, including the mountain pine beetle outbreak. The insects have killed more than six million acres of forest across Montana since 2000. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President Donald Trump told a crowd at the Davos World Economic Forum Tuesday that the U.S. will join the Forum's 1t.org initiative to restore and conserve one trillion trees around the world, according to The Hill.

Read More
Wild rice flatbread is one of many Native recipes found in Indigikitchen. Indigikitchen

The online cooking show Indigikitchen is providing a platform to help disseminate Indigenous food recipes — while helping eaters recognize their impact on the planet and Native communities.

Read More

On the Solomon Islands, rats and poachers are the two major threats to critically endangered sea turtles. A group of local women have joined forces to help save the animals from extinction.

Read More