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The Weather Channel to Breitbart: 'Earth Is Not Cooling, Climate Change Is Real'

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The Weather Channel to Breitbart: 'Earth Is Not Cooling, Climate Change Is Real'

In a bluntly titled blog post, Note to Breitbart: Earth Is Not Cooling, Climate Change Is Real and Please Stop Using Our Video to Mislead Americans, The Weather Channel took Breitbart to task for using a Weather.com video in an article about "global cooling."

The post lays out the misleading science behind the Breitbart piece and tells the outlet to "please call" the Weather Channel the next time they need a fact check on a climate-related piece.

It says:

The Breitbart article—a prime example of cherry picking, or pulling a single item out of context to build a misleading case—includes this statement: "The last three years may eventually come to be seen as the final death rattle of the global warming scare."

In fact, thousands of researchers and scientific societies are in agreement that greenhouse gases produced by human activity are warming the planet's climate and will keep doing so.

The Breitbart article was tweeted out from the official U.S. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology account last week, leading to furious backlash from the scientific community.

Sen. Bernie Sanders mocked the U.S. House Science Committee for retweeting the Breitbart article denying climate change.

For a deeper dive:

CBS, Politico, USA Today, The Hill, Mic, Gizmodo, Mashable, Business Insider, Yahoo, Washington Examiner, AJC

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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