Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

We Mean It, Bank of America: No More Money for Coal

Climate

350.org

By Jenny Marienau

Morning came early for us yesterday in Charlotte, NC. In the days leading up to May 9, busloads of activists from Miami to Olympia had joined the North Carolina community to protest the Bank of America Shareholder meeting. They joined us to stand together and stand up to the big Bank that calls Charlotte home.

In the last two years, Bank of America has thrown more money at the coal industry than any other bank—more than $4.2 million. We know that by investing in the dirty energy that is cooking our planet and making us sick, Bank of America is as responsible for climate change as the coal companies themselves.

That’s why yesterday, climate activists joined a movement fighting many of Bank of America’s short-sighted investment policies: racist and predatory lending, robo-signed foreclosures, loans for mountaintop removal. Nearly 1,000 of us marched through the Charlotte streets to the Shareholder meeting, flooding the intersection and halting traffic for a two-hour rally. Meanwhile, inside the shareholder meeting, members of impacted communities like Larry Gibson and Adam Hall of the West Virginia coal fields shared the experience of living life as Bank of America’s collateral damage.

While we had an incredible morning of singing, marching, and uniting our struggles on BofA’s doorstep, we wish these protests weren’t necessary in the first place. We want our big financial institutions like Bank of America to work for America. We want an economy that doesn’t prioritize quarterly profit when people’s lives and the future of our planet are at stake.

At the end of the day, we know that BofA CEO Brian Moynihan heard our cries, and plowed on with business as usual. But as long as Bank of America continues to put our homes (both our houses and our planetary home) at risk, we’ll be there to meet them with people power.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana has been converted to a 1,000-bed field hospital for coronavirus patients to alleviate stress on local hospitals. Chris Graythen / Getty Images

An area in Louisiana whose predominantly black and brown residents are hard-hit by health problems from industry overdevelopment is experiencing one of the highest death rates from coronavirus of any county in the United States.

Read More Show Less
A woman lies in bed with the flu. marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A central player in the fight against the novel coronavirus is our immune system. It protects us against the invader and can even be helpful for its therapy. But sometimes it can turn against us.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Several flower species, including the orchid, can recover quickly from severe injury, scientists have found. cunfek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Calling someone a delicate flower may not sting like it used to, according to new research. Scientists have found that many delicate flowers are actually remarkably hearty and able to bounce back from severe injury.

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 727 flies over approach lights with a trail of black-smoke from the engines on April 9, 2018. aviation-images.com / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

With global air travel at a near standstill, the airline industry is looking to rewrite the rules it agreed to tackle global emissions. The Guardian reports that the airline is billing it as a matter of survival, while environmental activists are accusing the industry of trying to dodge their obligations.

Read More Show Less
A National Guard member works on election day at a polling location on April 7, 2020 in Madison, Wisconsin. Andy Manis / Getty Images.

ByJulia Baumel

The outbreak of COVID-19 across the U.S. has touched every facet of our society, and our democracy has been no exception.

Read More Show Less