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23 Delicious Ways to Eat an Avocado

Health + Wellness
Healthline

By Arlene Semeco, MS, RD

Avocados can be added to many recipes to give your meals a nutritional boost.


Just 1 ounce (28 grams) provides good amounts of healthy fats, fiber, and protein.

Avocados may also aid heart health, weight control, and healthy aging (1Trusted Source, 2Trusted Source).

Here are 23 interesting ways to add avocados to your diet.

1. Seasoned

The simplest way to enjoy avocados is by sprinkling them with a pinch of salt and pepper.

You can also try other seasonings like paprika, cayenne pepper, balsamic vinegar, or lemon juice.

A quick way to season an avocado is to cut it into chunks and drizzle it with a little olive oil, balsamic vinegar, pepper, and salt.

2. Stuffed

If you're looking for more nutritious morning meals, try incorporating avocados into your breakfast.

One way to do this is to fill half an avocado with one egg and bake for 15–20 at 425℉ (220℃) until the egg white has fully set.

You can also top the avocado with crumbled, cooked bacon and season it with fresh herbs and spices like parsley, cayenne pepper, salt, and regular pepper.

Furthermore, you can replace the eggs with other ingredients, such as tuna, chicken, vegetables, and fruits.

A simple online search will give you plenty of stuffed avocado recipes to choose from.

3. In Scrambled Eggs

If you want to give a regular morning dish a twist, incorporate some avocado into your scrambled eggs.

Simply add diced avocado to your eggs while they're cooking in a pan. Make sure to do this when the eggs are halfway cooked to avoid burning the avocado and continue cooking them until the avocado is warm.

If you prefer cooler avocado, add it after the eggs are cooked and off the stove.

Finish the dish by topping it with some shredded cheese and season it with salt and pepper to taste.

4. On Toast

It's possible to substitute regular spreads like butter and margarine with avocados.

Using puréed avocado as a spread on toast and sandwiches also adds extra vitamins and minerals to your meal.

5. In Guacamole

Guacamole might be among the most famous Mexican dishes.

You can make it using only avocados, herbs, and seasonings, or you can combine it with other great ingredients like corn, pineapple, broccoli, and quinoa.

6. As a Substitute for Mayo

Avocados can be an ideal substitute in dishes that use mayonnaise as a binder ingredient.

For example, you can use avocado to make tuna, chicken, or egg salads.

7. In Salads

Research shows that the extra calories from fat and fiber in avocados may help keep you fuller for longer, which may reduce calorie intake at subsequent meals (3Trusted Source).

Since salads can be light in calories, adding avocados can make them a more filling meal.

8. In Soups

Another excellent way to enjoy avocados is in soups.

Avocados can be used as the main ingredient to make avocado soup, or you can add chunks of this green fruit to other soups.

You can find many nutritious soup recipes that incorporate avocados online. These soups can often be enjoyed chilled or hot.

9. As a Substitute for Sour Cream

Avocados can be perfect for dishes that are usually made with sour cream.

For instance, you can make baked potatoes topped with mashed avocados and shredded cheese.

Another option is to make a dairy-free sour cream substitute by blending:

  • 2 avocados
  • the juice of 2 limes
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of water
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of olive or avocado oil
  • a pinch of salt
  • a pinch of pepper

10. In Sushi Rolls

Sushi is a staple in Japanese cuisine. It's usually made using rice, seaweed, and fish or shellfish.

However, avocados are widely used in sushi rolls as well. They have a creamy mouthfeel and can be used to fill or top sushi rolls.

11. Grilled

Avocados can also be grilled, making them a great side dish, especially for barbecued meats.

Simply cut an avocado in half and remove the seed. Drizzle the halves with lemon juice and brush them with olive oil. Place the cut side down on the grill and cook for 2–3 minutes.

Finally, season them with salt and pepper or any other seasoning of your choice.

12. Pickled

Avocado pickles are delicious and can be used in any dish in which you would typically use avocados, such as salads and sandwiches.

To make them, place 1 cup (240 ml) of white vinegar, 1 cup (240 ml) of water, and 1 tablespoon of salt in a saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil.

Then, pour the mix into a jar and add three diced, unripe avocados. Finally, cover them with a lid and let them marinate for a couple of days before eating.

The pickling solution can be flavored with different ingredients like garlic, fresh herbs, mustard seeds, peppercorns, or chilies.

13. As Fries

Avocado fries can make a scrumptious side dish, appetizer, or substitute for regular potato fries.

They can either be deep fried or, better yet, baked for a healthier version.

You can enjoy your avocado fries with different dipping sauces, such as ketchup, mustard, aioli, or ranch.

14. As a Topping

Avocados are a great addition to many recipes. For example, avocado slices are perfect to top sandwiches, burgers, and even pizza.

They're also great for sprinkling on typical Mexican dishes like tacos and nachos.

15. In Smoothies

Smoothies can be a perfect meal or snack substitute.

You can combine avocado with green, leafy vegetables like kale and fruits like banana, pineapple, or berries. Plus, for a protein-packed beverage, try adding protein powder, Greek yogurt, or milk.

For a quick smoothie, blend the following:

  • 1 ripe avocado, halved and pitted
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1 cup (240 ml) of milk
  • 1/2 cup (125 grams) of vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup (15 grams) of spinach
  • ice to taste

The options are endless when it comes to smoothies, and you can find countless recipes online or in specialized books.

16. As an Ice Cream

Avocado ice cream can be a healthier and more nutritious option than regular ice cream.

It can be made by combining avocado, lime juice, milk, cream, and sugar.

For a lighter option, you can substitute milk and cream for almond or coconut milk and sugar for honey.

Plus, avocado ice pops are a delicious and refreshing way to keep you cool on hot days.

17. In Salad Dressing

Store-bought creamy dressings can add a ton of sugar and unhealthy vegetable oils to your salad. Making your own dressing is always recommended to keep your salad nutritious and low in calories.

Salad dressing made with avocado not only has a smooth consistency, it's also delicious and full of nutrients.

Just blend together the following ingredients and add more water as needed to adjust the consistency:

  • 1/2 avocado
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) of water
  • 3/4 cup (12 grams) of chopped cilantro
  • the juice of 1 lime
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1/4 cup (60 grams) of Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon of ground black pepper

18. In Desserts

Avocado can be used as a vegan substitute for shortening, butter, eggs, and oils in baking.

This substitution can reduce the calorie content of foods. For example, 2 tablespoons (30 grams) of avocado only have 48 calories, compared with 200 calories for the same serving of butter (4, 5).

Plus, swapping in avocado is easy, as 1 cup (230 grams) of oil or butter equals 1 cup (230 grams) of mashed avocado. Additionally, 1 egg equals 2–4 tablespoons (30–60 grams) of mashed avocado.

Avocado is often used to make chocolate cakes, brownies, mousse, and pudding, as its green color will be hidden in the dark chocolate color.

19. In Bread


Avocado is a great ingredient to make bread.

Switch it up by making your favorite banana bread recipe with avocado instead of bananas.

Alternatively, keep the bananas, add cocoa powder, and replace butter or oil with avocado for a scrumptious chocolate-avocado-banana bread.

20. In Hummus

Hummus is a nutrient-rich dish usually made with chickpeas, olive oil, and tahini.

Chickpeas are an excellent source of protein and fiber, and tahini and olive oil provide monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (6, 7).

Adding avocado to this mixture can increase the fiber and healthy fat contents of the dish. Furthermore, the avocado contributes to the creaminess of the hummus.

21. In Pasta Sauces

Avocados can be used to make a delicious and creamy avocado sauce for pasta dishes.

Vegetables that go well with this sauce include tomatoes and corn.

Moreover, you can add a spin to your mac and cheese by incorporating avocado into the recipe.

22. In Pancakes

Pancakes are high in carbs, but adding avocado can provide extra nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.

These pancakes also have an attractive green color and creamy, thick consistency.

Additionally, you can add fruit like blueberries to increase the nutrient content of the pancakes.

23. In Drinks

Avocados can be used to make incredible cocktails like margaritas, daiquiris, or martinis.

Even though they're all made differently, they have a similar creamy consistency.

Non-alcoholic versions of these drinks can be made by simply omitting the alcohol.

The Bottom Line

Eating avocados has been shown to benefit your health in various ways.

They're surprisingly easy to incorporate into recipes, contributing to both the texture and nutrient content of many meals.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline.

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