Quantcast

Waterkeepers Paddle for 40th Anniversary of Clean Water Act

Potomac Riverkeeper

Waterkeepers from around the country joined more than a hundred paddlers on the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. to rally for clean water on Sept. 15. Paddlers, including more than 30 Waterkeeper organizations from Shenandoah Riverkeeper in Virginia to Klamath Riverkeeper in California, brought their boats, kayaks, canoes and stand up paddle boards and congregated under Key Bridge. They demonstrated solidarity for the Clean Water Act by paddling together towards the Georgetown waterfront.

It was the largest gathering of Waterkeepers on the Potomac ever. It was an amazing sight.

Marc Yaggi, Waterkeeper Alliance executive director, opened the rally, addressing both the spectators at Georgetown Waterfront Park and paddlers in the water. He was followed by speakers, Jeff Corbin senior advisor for the Environmental Protection Agency for Chesapeake Bay, David Baron managing attorney for Earthjustice and local Waterkeepers, all in agreement that the Clean Water Act works.

The Clean Water Act works for our economy, our health and our communities. Clean water creates jobs and it’s more cost effective to invest in clean water than it is to clean polluted water. Clean water is essential for healthy families and communities.

As Potomac Riverkeeper Ed Merrifield reminded the audience, the human body is about two-thirds water and those living in the DC area “are mostly Potomac River.”

“We have a right to clean water! Let’s uphold the Clean Water Act!” Baron said passionately. “[It] was a ray of hope 40 years ago.” But now polluters and many in Congress are rolling back commonsense environmental protections.

Waterkeepers all around the nation use the Clean Water Act every day to protect local waterways. But is that enough? “Seventy percent of the Earth’s surface is water. Shouldn’t 70 percent of the world work on protecting that resource?” Corbin said.

The rally to celebrate the Clean Water Act’s 40th Anniversary was a call to everyone to participate in the protection of clean water and to fight for the health of their families and communities.

“I want to say thank you to the 1972 Congress,” Merrifield said. Let’s ensure that 40 years from now, we can say thank you to ourselves for upholding what the 1972 Congress intended for future generations—drinkable, fishable, swimmable waters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit EcoWatch’s CLEAN WATER ACT page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Colombia rainforest. Marcel Oosterwijk / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Torsten Krause

Many of us think of the Amazon as an untouched wilderness, but people have been thriving in these diverse environments for millennia. Due to this long history, the knowledge that Indigenous and forest communities pass between generations about plants, animals and forest ecology is incredibly rich and detailed and easily dwarfs that of any expert.

Read More Show Less
picture-alliance / Newscom / R. Ben Ari

By Wesley Rahn

Plastic byproducts were found in 97 percent of blood and urine samples from 2,500 children tested between 2014 and 2017, according to a study by the German Environment Ministry and the Robert Koch Institute.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

Medically reviewed by Daniel Bubnis, MS, NASM-CPT, NASE Level II-CSS

Written by James Roland

Hot yoga has become a popular exercise in recent years. It offers many of the same benefits as traditional yoga, such as stress reduction, improved strength, and flexibility.

Read More Show Less
Lara Hata / iStock / Getty Images

By SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD

Rice is a staple in many people's diets. It's filling, inexpensive, and a great mild-tasting addition to flavorful dishes.

Read More Show Less
Hinterhaus Productions / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Lindsay Campbell

From pastries to plant-based—we've got you covered.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
An image of the trans-alaskan oil pipeline that carries oil from the northern part of Alaska all the way to valdez. This shot is right near the arctic national wildlife refuge. kyletperry / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The Trump administration has initialized the final steps to open up nearly 1.6 million acres of the protected Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge to allow oil and gas drilling.

Read More Show Less
Westend61 / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Vegetarianism has become increasingly popular in recent years.

Read More Show Less
Kaboompics / Pexels

Tensions between lawmakers and several large manufacturing companies came to a head on Capitol Hill this week during a hearing on toxic fluorochemicals in U.S. drinking water.

Read More Show Less