Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Waterkeepers March!

Climate
Waterkeepers March!

It was euphoric!

Never in my life have I been in such a mass of humanity as I was today in New York City in the largest climate march in world history. Joining me were 100 members of Waterkeeper Alliance as we marched along with more than 300,000 people through the streets of Manhattan. The march was three times bigger than anyone expected. The day was simply amazing.

More than 100 Waterkeepers participated in the People's Climate March on Sept. 21.

We started near 72nd Street on Central Park West and it took nearly two hours to go the first 15 blocks. Helicopters circled, police scrambled, humanity roared. We looped around Central Park, marched along the Avenue of the Americas, and then headed to Times Square.

On normal days, Waterkeepers are busy holding polluters accountable and working to make waterways swimmable, fishable and drinkable, but on Sept. 21 in New York City we marched!

The climate crisis is a water crisis. Rising sea levels, flooding, drought, water pollution and more are all tied to climate change.

We were proud to join our friends and colleagues in the environmental and social justice movements to raise awareness on the dangers of climate change and encourage our political leaders to take strong action.

Gary Wockner, PhD, is the Waterkeeper for the Cache la Poudre River in northern Colorado.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

300,000+ Demand Climate Action Now at Largest Climate March in World History

Naomi Klein on Democracy Now! Discussing Capitalism vs. the Climate

How Climate Change Exacerbates the Spread of Disease, Including Ebola

The western edge of the Greenland ice sheet in West Greenland as seen from the air. Ashley Cooper / Getty Images

As the world's ice sheets melt at an increasing rate, researchers are looking for explanations beyond just a hotter climate. A recent study found one answer may lie in the dust.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg protests during a "Fridays for Future" protest in front of the Swedish Parliament Riksdagen in Stockholm on October 9. Jonathan Nackstrand / AFP / Getty Images

By Greta Thunberg

  • Greta Thunberg calls for urgent action to address the climate and ecological crisis.
  • She reminds the world of the promises made to children and grandchildren — a promise they expect to be kept.
  • The proposals being discussed and presented at the moment are 'very far from being enough.'
Read More Show Less

Trending

A dugong, also called a sea cow, swims with golden pilot jacks near Marsa Alam, Egypt, Red Sea. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

In 2010, world leaders agreed to 20 targets to protect Earth's biodiversity over the next decade. By 2020, none of them had been met. Now, the question is whether the world can do any better once new targets are set during the meeting of the UN Convention on Biodiversity in Kunming, China later this year.

Read More Show Less
President Joe Biden signs executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Jan. 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

By Andrew Rosenberg

The first 24 hours of the administration of President Joe Biden were filled not only with ceremony, but also with real action. Executive orders and other directives were quickly signed. More actions have followed. All consequential. Many provide a basis for not just undoing actions of the previous administration, but also making real advances in public policy to protect public health, safety, and the environment.

Read More Show Less
Melting ice forms a lake on free-floating ice jammed into the Ilulissat Icefjord during unseasonably warm weather on July 30, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A first-of-its-kind study has examined the satellite record to see how the climate crisis is impacting all of the planet's ice.

Read More Show Less