Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Waterkeepers March!

Climate
Waterkeepers March!

It was euphoric!

Never in my life have I been in such a mass of humanity as I was today in New York City in the largest climate march in world history. Joining me were 100 members of Waterkeeper Alliance as we marched along with more than 300,000 people through the streets of Manhattan. The march was three times bigger than anyone expected. The day was simply amazing.

More than 100 Waterkeepers participated in the People's Climate March on Sept. 21.

We started near 72nd Street on Central Park West and it took nearly two hours to go the first 15 blocks. Helicopters circled, police scrambled, humanity roared. We looped around Central Park, marched along the Avenue of the Americas, and then headed to Times Square.

On normal days, Waterkeepers are busy holding polluters accountable and working to make waterways swimmable, fishable and drinkable, but on Sept. 21 in New York City we marched!

The climate crisis is a water crisis. Rising sea levels, flooding, drought, water pollution and more are all tied to climate change.

We were proud to join our friends and colleagues in the environmental and social justice movements to raise awareness on the dangers of climate change and encourage our political leaders to take strong action.

Gary Wockner, PhD, is the Waterkeeper for the Cache la Poudre River in northern Colorado.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

300,000+ Demand Climate Action Now at Largest Climate March in World History

Naomi Klein on Democracy Now! Discussing Capitalism vs. the Climate

How Climate Change Exacerbates the Spread of Disease, Including Ebola

Florida Wildlife Federation / NBC2News / YouTube

In a dramatic rescue captured on camera, a Florida man ran into a pond and pried open an alligator's mouth in order to rescue his beloved puppy, all without dropping his cigar.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Imagesines / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Jean-Marc Neveu and Olivier Civil never expected to find themselves battling against disposable mask pollution.

When they founded their recycling start-up Plaxtil in 2017, it was textile waste they set their sights on. The project developed a process that turned fabrics into a new recyclable material they describe as "ecological plastic."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Fossil fuel companies received $110 billion in direct and indirect financial assistance during the coronavirus pandemic, including up to $15.2 billion in direct federal relief. Andrew Hart /

By Bret Wilkins

In a year in which the United States has already suffered 16 climate-driven extreme weather events causing more than $1 billion in economic damages, and as millions of American workers face loss of essential unemployment benefits due to congressional inaction, a report published Monday reveals the Trump administration has given fossil fuel companies as much as $15.2 billion in direct relief — and tens of billions more indirectly — through federal COVID-19 recovery programs since March.

Read More Show Less
Flint corn is an example of pre-contact food. Elenathewise / Getty Images

By Ashia Aubourg

As Thanksgiving approaches, some Indigenous organizations and activists caution against perpetuating further injustices towards Native communities. Indigenous activist Mariah Gladstone, for example, encourages eaters to celebrate the harvest time in ways that do not involve stereotypes and pilgrim stories.

Read More Show Less

By Alex Middleton

Losing weight and reducing fat is a hard battle to fight. Thankfully, there are fat burner supplements that help you gain your target body and goal. However, how would you know which supplement is right for you?

Read More Show Less