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Waterkeeper Magazine: Climate Wars—Stories from the Frontlines

Climate

Waterkeeper Alliance

Across the world, from New York’s Hudson River to Bangladesh’s Buriganga, more than 200 Waterkeepers are fighting destructive fossil-fuel projects, to protect their watersheds and the planet. Find out what Waterkeepers around the globe are doing to fight dirty energy and to protect our planet’s most precious resource, in our biannual Waterkeeper Magazine.

"Last year was the hottest year on record in the United States,” Robert F. Kennedy Jr. writes in his article, Why I Got Arrested at the White House, that leads off this issue. “More than half the country suffered severe drought; the Mississippi River was at near-record lows; wildfires swept through the West, and Superstorm Sandy flooded the East Coast, virtually paralyzing one of the greatest cities in the world, New York. Similar weather-related calamities are now happening regularly across the world. A global crisis is unfolding before our eyes, and immediate action is required."

The spring issue features stories from Waterkeepers fighting massive industrial polluters, the truth about farm-raised salmon, and shocking images of the devastation to small communities caused by fracking.

Click here to read this digitally enhanced issue of Waterkeeper Magazine.

Visit EcoWatch’s WATER and CLIMATE CHANGE pages for more related news on this topic.

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