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Waterkeeper Alliance Launches 2013 Swim Guide Website and Mobile App

Health + Wellness

Waterkeeper Alliance

For millions of beachgoers, swimmers and surfers across the U.S. and Canada, finding and enjoying that perfect stretch of sand and water has just become a whole lot easier with the launch of the Swim Guide, a new, free, smartphone app.
 
Provided and managed by member groups within Waterkeeper Alliance, a network of 207 water protection groups worldwide, the Swim Guide helps the user locate the closest, cleanest beach, get directions, view photos and determine if the water is safe for swimming. The Swim Guide also allows the user to share the whole adventure with their friends and family on social networks. Waterkeeper Alliance is proud to partner with Hertz on the Waterkeeper Swim Guide.


 
“Every year, millions of people get sick from coming into contact with polluted water at their local beaches,” said Marc Yaggi, executive director for the Waterkeeper Alliance.“The Swim Guide provides a free, easy to use, way for people to find a beach where their families can swim and enjoy the beach safely.”
 
"The Swim Guide re-connects communities with their waterways by telling people how to find the closest beach and if it safe to swim when they get there,” said Waterkeeper Alliance President Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

“An informed public is the foundation stone of a functioning democracy by making water quality data easily available. This app will promote healthy public debate about the costs of pollution to our communities.”


 
The Swim Guide utilizes water quality monitoring data from government authorities to determine the water quality at nearly 5,000 beaches across North America and is updated as frequently as the water quality information is gathered.
 
The innovative, free Swim Guide app also includes descriptions and photographs of beaches and employs a tool for citizens to report a pollution problem from their smartphone or through the website.

Visit EcoWatch’s WATER page for more related news on this topic.

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