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Waterkeeper Alliance Celebrates Swimmable Waters Action Day

Waterkeeper Alliance Celebrates Swimmable Waters Action Day

Waterkeeper Alliance

On July 26, Waterkeeper Alliance celebrated Swimmable Waters Action Day and encouraged everybody to take time out and enjoy their local waterways. The event was organized as a reminder that access to clean, swimmable water isn't something that can be taken for granted.

Laws like the Clean Water Act and water advocacy organizations like Waterkeeper Alliance and its member programs across the globe make it possible to maintain water quality that is safe for swimming. As part of the action, Waterkeeper Alliance asked people to share their swim pictures on the Waterkeeper Alliance Facebook page.

For your Friday moment of Zen, we thought we would share those pictures with the hope that they inspire you to pack up friends, family and water-loving pets and head out to your local waterway this weekend. Enjoy!

To see more of Waterkeeper Alliance's great work, check out their new interactive online magazine. The current edition was just released yesterday. It highlights the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act and how the law is vital to swimmable, fishable and drinkable waters. The magazine has clean water videos embedded in the digital pages that play when you "turn" the page. Check it out if you want to extend your water-themed Friday moment of Zen.

Riverkeeper Hartwell Carson and friends swinging on a vine into the headwaters of the French Broad River in western North Carolina.

 


Waterkeeper Nabil Musa sends his wishes for a happy worldwide Swimmable Action Day from Iraq with this dive into the ancient waters of the Upper Tigris River.

 

Family, friends and the all important duck inner tube enjoy the Russian River at Fitch Mountain.

 


A future Riverkeeper enjoys the Hudson River thanks to Riverkeeper's 30 years of work to clean up the river and make happy faces like this possible.

 

 


It is important to keep water in the Colorado River—it makes people happy.

 

How to enjoy the dog days of summer in Biscayne Bay, Florida from Biscayne Baykeeper Alexis Segal.

 


At the Isle of Wight Bay wade in with the Assateague Coastkeeper crew.

 


Hearty souls swimming in Puget Sound thanks to all the work of Puget Soundkeeper to clean up sewage pollution.

 


Happy kids enjoy the Congaree River near Columbia, South Carolina.

 


Having fun on the Hooch! The Chattahoochee River in Georgia is clean enough to swim in again thanks to more than a decade of work by the Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper and the city of Atlanta to clean up sewage discharges.

 

 


Waterkeeper Swim Guide genius and Lake Ontario Waterkeeper Vice President Krystyn Tully takes her laptop to the beach because Canada's beautiful waters inspire her work to give the world a high tech tool smart phone app to insure you and your family swim in clean waters.

 


Ottawa Riverkeeper Meredith Brown's family jumping off a floating dock yesterday into Trout Lake, headwaters

 

 

Visit EcoWatch's WATER page for more related news on this topic.

 

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