Quantcast

Waterkeeper Alliance Celebrates National Fishable Action Day

Waterkeeper Alliance

Today Waterkeeper Alliance and their local affiliates around the country are celebrating Fishable Action Day, a day to raise awareness regarding the importance of fishable waters and what that means to the health and well-being of the community. This day of action is designed to promote access to clean, fishable waters globally and to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act that has provided safeguards to U.S. drinking water and fishing spots.

Despite its strengths and successes, the Clean Water Act has been slowly eroded by ongoing attacks from polluters and those in Congress who value corporate profits over the health of our waterways and our communities. Fishable Action Day hopes to draw attention to how far we have come in cleaning up our waters and the next steps in limiting and cleaning up mercury pollution.

Although most mercury contamination begins as air pollution from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants, it quickly falls out of the air into waterways. In December 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a new rule regulating mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants—a rule that Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) attempted to have rescinded yesterday that the Senate thankfully killed.

"Yesterday the Senate did the right thing for the health of our children, our communities and the environment. It is sad, however, that these things were even up for discussion and were being threatened by the coal industry and their minions in Congress," said Peter Nichols, western regional director for the Waterkeeper Alliance.

The EPA and Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that 1 in 6 U.S. women carry dangerous mercury levels endangering 640,000 children annually.

In the Pacific Northwest, Waterkeeper organizations are combating another insidious attack on the Clean Water Act. Last year, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in NEDC v. Brown stating that the Clean Water Act requires permits for discharges of polluted storm water from pipes, ditches and channels along logging roads. Across the West, logging roads are the leading source of sediment pollution from logging activities. But Big Timber is pushing Congress to exempt them from the Clean Water Act giving them the ability to dump massive qualities of waste and pollution into our nation’s rivers and streams. Waterkeeper organizations across the west will use National Fishable Action Day to raise awareness about the threats posed to clean water and our nation's fisheries by the impacts of logging roads.

“The impacts from industrial logging clog our rivers and streams with sediment and other pollutants that devastate the iconic fish stocks of the Pacific Northwest,” Lesley Adams of Rogue Riverkeeper said. “The court has clearly stated that this industry must comply with the Clean Water Act to protect these resources and are demanding that the EPA uphold that ruling."

Visit EcoWatch's CLEAN WATER ACT page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Cracker Lake, Glacier National Park, Montana. Jacob W. Frank / NPS / Flickr

By Jason Bittel

High up in the mountains of Montana's Glacier National Park, there are two species of insect that only a fly fishermen or entomologist would probably recognize. Known as stoneflies, these aquatic bugs are similar to dragonflies and mayflies in that they spend part of their lives underwater before emerging onto the land, where they transform into winged adults less than a half inch long. However, unlike those other species, stoneflies do their thing only where cold, clean waters flow.

Read More
Augusta National / Getty Images

By Bob Curley

  • The new chicken sandwiches at McDonald's, Popeyes, and Chick-fil-A all contain the MSG flavor enhancement chemical.
  • Experts say MSG can enhance the so-called umami flavor of a food.
  • The ingredient is found in everything from Chinese food and pizza to prepackaged sandwiches and table sauces.

McDonald's wants to get in on the chicken sandwich war currently being waged between Popeyes and Chick-fil-A.

Read More
Sponsored
Protesters march during a "Friday for future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Youth climate activists marched through the streets of Davos, Switzerland Friday as the World Economic Forum wrapped up in a Fridays for Future demonstration underscoring their demand that the global elite act swiftly to tackle the climate emergency.

Read More
chuchart duangdaw / Moment / Getty Images

By Tim Radford

The year is less than four weeks old, but scientists already know that carbon dioxide emissions will continue to head upwards — as they have every year since measurements began leading to a continuation of the Earth's rising heat.

Read More
Lucy Lambriex / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson

Each year, an estimated 600 million people worldwide experience a foodborne illness.

While there are many causes, a major and preventable one is cross-contamination.

Read More