Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Waterkeeper Alliance Celebrates National Fishable Action Day

Waterkeeper Alliance

Today Waterkeeper Alliance and their local affiliates around the country are celebrating Fishable Action Day, a day to raise awareness regarding the importance of fishable waters and what that means to the health and well-being of the community. This day of action is designed to promote access to clean, fishable waters globally and to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act that has provided safeguards to U.S. drinking water and fishing spots.

Despite its strengths and successes, the Clean Water Act has been slowly eroded by ongoing attacks from polluters and those in Congress who value corporate profits over the health of our waterways and our communities. Fishable Action Day hopes to draw attention to how far we have come in cleaning up our waters and the next steps in limiting and cleaning up mercury pollution.

Although most mercury contamination begins as air pollution from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants, it quickly falls out of the air into waterways. In December 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a new rule regulating mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants—a rule that Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) attempted to have rescinded yesterday that the Senate thankfully killed.

"Yesterday the Senate did the right thing for the health of our children, our communities and the environment. It is sad, however, that these things were even up for discussion and were being threatened by the coal industry and their minions in Congress," said Peter Nichols, western regional director for the Waterkeeper Alliance.

The EPA and Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that 1 in 6 U.S. women carry dangerous mercury levels endangering 640,000 children annually.

In the Pacific Northwest, Waterkeeper organizations are combating another insidious attack on the Clean Water Act. Last year, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in NEDC v. Brown stating that the Clean Water Act requires permits for discharges of polluted storm water from pipes, ditches and channels along logging roads. Across the West, logging roads are the leading source of sediment pollution from logging activities. But Big Timber is pushing Congress to exempt them from the Clean Water Act giving them the ability to dump massive qualities of waste and pollution into our nation’s rivers and streams. Waterkeeper organizations across the west will use National Fishable Action Day to raise awareness about the threats posed to clean water and our nation's fisheries by the impacts of logging roads.

“The impacts from industrial logging clog our rivers and streams with sediment and other pollutants that devastate the iconic fish stocks of the Pacific Northwest,” Lesley Adams of Rogue Riverkeeper said. “The court has clearly stated that this industry must comply with the Clean Water Act to protect these resources and are demanding that the EPA uphold that ruling."

Visit EcoWatch's CLEAN WATER ACT page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less
A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus. blackCAT / Getty Images

By Joni Sweet

If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of burnt areas of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia state, Brazil, on Aug. 24, 2019. CARLOS FABAL / AFP via Getty Images

NASA scientists say that warmer than average surface sea temperatures in the North Atlantic raise the concern for a more active hurricane season, as well as for wildfires in the Amazon thousands of miles away, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
A baby receives limited treatment at a hospital in Yemen on June 27, 2020. Mohammed Hamoud / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Oxfam International warned Thursday that up to 12,000 people could die each day by the end of the year as a result of hunger linked to the coronavirus pandemic—a daily death toll surpassing the daily mortality rate from Covid-19 itself.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The 2006 oil spill was the largest incident in Philippine history and damaged 1,600 acres of mangrove forests. Shubert Ciencia / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jun N. Aguirre

An oil spill on July 3 threatens a mangrove forest on the Philippine island of Guimaras, an area only just recovering from the country's largest spill in 2006.

Read More Show Less