Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Water Sales to Fracking Industry Stopped in Southern Ohio

Energy
Water Sales to Fracking Industry Stopped in Southern Ohio

Buckeye Forest Council

The Muskingum Water Conservancy District (MWCD) announced today that it is halting water sales to the oil and gas industry pending the completion of a U.S. Geological Survey water availability study and the revision of its water supply policy.

The MWCD cited concerns presented by members of the public and environmental groups as reason for the announcement.

The MWCD's announcement follows a June 2 rally and protest on the steps of the Tuscarawas County Courthouse in New Philadelphia, Ohio. At the rally led by the Southeast Alliance to Save Our Water and the Buckeye Forest Council, concerned citizens came out in force to protest a potential decision by the MWCD to sell millions of gallons of public water to fracking operations.

The rally coincided with the annual meeting of the MWCD's Conservancy Court, a panel of 18 judges (one from each county in the district) whose mission includes reviewing and approving or denying proposed District water sales.

Several concerned citizens and green groups testified before the Conservancy Court to express their opposition to large-scale, fracking-related water sales, including Lea Harper, district resident and founding member of Southeast Ohio Alliance to Save Our Water; Nathan Johnson, staff attorney for the Buckeye Forest Council; Loraine McCosker of the Sierra Club Ohio Chapter; Melanie Houston, director of Water Policy & Environmental Health at the Ohio Environmental Council; Alison Auciello of Food & Water Watch; and John Makley of Mohican Advocates.

“I would like to extend our sincere gratitude to the MWCD for listening to our serious concerns and for being willing to allow more public input,” said Lea Harper. “I believe this is also another good sign that progress can be made for the sake of public benefit and the long-term preservation of precious natural resources if people continue to rally together and collaborate on this important issue of unconventional shale drilling and massive water withdrawals. We at Southeast Ohio Alliance to Save Our Water will continue to do our own analysis of large water withdrawals and their potential impacts in the state. We will await the results of the proposed changes to policy and go from there. This is certainly a good day in the Muskingum Watershed.”

Harper added, “I would also like to say that we don't think this would have happened without the support of individuals traveling from all over the state to attend the rally last Saturday, and the environmental organizations who were there, too.”

“We are glad the Conservancy District listened to the concerns of the public in making its decision to suspend water sales to fracking operations,” said Johnson. “We hope the district will include the public as they consider and formulate a new water sales policy. The sale of millions to potentially billions of gallons from the district to fracking operations could result in a host of serious environmental impacts. All of these impacts demand close study before a new water policy is approved."

Visit EcoWatch's FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 


OlgaMiltsova / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Gwen Ranniger

In the midst of a pandemic, sales of cleaning products have skyrocketed, and many feel a need to clean more often. Knowing what to look for when purchasing cleaning supplies can help prevent unwanted and dangerous toxics from entering your home.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter


JasonOndreicka / iStock / Getty Images

Twenty-five years ago, a food called Tofurky made its debut on grocery store shelves. Since then, the tofu-based roast has become a beloved part of many vegetarians' holiday feasts.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Protestors walk past an image of a Native American woman during a march to "Count Every Vote, Protect Every Person" after the U.S. presidential Election in Seattle, Washington on November 4. Jason Redmond / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A leading environmental advocacy group marked Native American Heritage Month on Wednesday by urging President-elect Joe Biden, Vice President-elect Kamala Kamala Harris, and the entire incoming administration "to honor Indigenous sovereignty and immediately halt the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and Line 3 pipelines."

Read More Show Less
Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less
Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less