Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Water Sales to Fracking Industry Stopped in Southern Ohio

Energy
Water Sales to Fracking Industry Stopped in Southern Ohio

Buckeye Forest Council

The Muskingum Water Conservancy District (MWCD) announced today that it is halting water sales to the oil and gas industry pending the completion of a U.S. Geological Survey water availability study and the revision of its water supply policy.

The MWCD cited concerns presented by members of the public and environmental groups as reason for the announcement.

The MWCD's announcement follows a June 2 rally and protest on the steps of the Tuscarawas County Courthouse in New Philadelphia, Ohio. At the rally led by the Southeast Alliance to Save Our Water and the Buckeye Forest Council, concerned citizens came out in force to protest a potential decision by the MWCD to sell millions of gallons of public water to fracking operations.

The rally coincided with the annual meeting of the MWCD's Conservancy Court, a panel of 18 judges (one from each county in the district) whose mission includes reviewing and approving or denying proposed District water sales.

Several concerned citizens and green groups testified before the Conservancy Court to express their opposition to large-scale, fracking-related water sales, including Lea Harper, district resident and founding member of Southeast Ohio Alliance to Save Our Water; Nathan Johnson, staff attorney for the Buckeye Forest Council; Loraine McCosker of the Sierra Club Ohio Chapter; Melanie Houston, director of Water Policy & Environmental Health at the Ohio Environmental Council; Alison Auciello of Food & Water Watch; and John Makley of Mohican Advocates.

“I would like to extend our sincere gratitude to the MWCD for listening to our serious concerns and for being willing to allow more public input,” said Lea Harper. “I believe this is also another good sign that progress can be made for the sake of public benefit and the long-term preservation of precious natural resources if people continue to rally together and collaborate on this important issue of unconventional shale drilling and massive water withdrawals. We at Southeast Ohio Alliance to Save Our Water will continue to do our own analysis of large water withdrawals and their potential impacts in the state. We will await the results of the proposed changes to policy and go from there. This is certainly a good day in the Muskingum Watershed.”

Harper added, “I would also like to say that we don't think this would have happened without the support of individuals traveling from all over the state to attend the rally last Saturday, and the environmental organizations who were there, too.”

“We are glad the Conservancy District listened to the concerns of the public in making its decision to suspend water sales to fracking operations,” said Johnson. “We hope the district will include the public as they consider and formulate a new water sales policy. The sale of millions to potentially billions of gallons from the district to fracking operations could result in a host of serious environmental impacts. All of these impacts demand close study before a new water policy is approved."

Visit EcoWatch's FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

With restaurants and supermarkets becoming less viable options during the pandemic, there has been a growth in demand and supply of local food. Baker County Tourism Travel Baker County / Flickr

By Robin Scher

Beyond the questions surrounding the availability, effectiveness and safety of a vaccine, the COVID-19 pandemic has led us to question where our food is coming from and whether we will have enough.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Tearing through the crowded streets of Philadelphia, an electric car and a gas-powered car sought to win a heated race. One that mimicked how cars are actually used. The cars had to stop at stoplights, wait for pedestrians to cross the street, and swerve in and out of the hundreds of horse-drawn buggies. That's right, horse-drawn buggies. Because this race took place in 1908. It wanted to settle once and for all which car was the superior urban vehicle. Although the gas-powered car was more powerful, the electric car was more versatile. As the cars passed over the finish line, the defeat was stunning. The 1908 Studebaker electric car won by 10 minutes. If in 1908, the electric car was clearly the better form of transportation, why don't we drive them now? Today, I'm going to answer that question by diving into the history of electric cars and what I discovered may surprise you.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A technician inspects a bitcoin mining operation at Bitfarms in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec on March 19, 2018. LARS HAGBERG / AFP via Getty Images

As bitcoin's fortunes and prominence rise, so do concerns about its environmental impact.

Read More Show Less
OR-93 traveled hundreds of miles from Oregon to California. Austin Smith Jr. / Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs / California Department of Fish and Wildlife

An Oregon-born wolf named OR-93 has sparked conservation hopes with a historic journey into California.

Read More Show Less
A plume of exhaust extends from the Mitchell Power Station, a coal-fired power plant built along the Monongahela River, 20 miles southwest of Pittsburgh, on Sept. 24, 2013 in New Eagle, Pennsylvania. The plant, owned by FirstEnergy, was retired the following month. Jeff Swensen / Getty Images

By David Drake and Jeffrey York

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The Big Idea

People often point to plunging natural gas prices as the reason U.S. coal-fired power plants have been shutting down at a faster pace in recent years. However, new research shows two other forces had a much larger effect: federal regulation and a well-funded activist campaign that launched in 2011 with the goal of ending coal power.

Read More Show Less