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Water Planet Challenge Adds Resources to Help Educators in the Classroom

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EarthEcho International

EarthEcho International is pleased to introduce Hot Topics. A new resource on the Water Planet Challenge site, Hot Topics are monthly interviews with individuals providing in-depth information on stories at the forefront of today’s news.

The inaugural Hot Topic looks at the one year anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the Northeast coastal region of Japan. What happened at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011? And what about the marine debris expected to arrive on the coastlines of the U.S. and Canada? EarthEcho presents two Hot Topic interviews and supporting video and print resources to help educators, students and families better understand the situation in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident—Nuclear Energy with Susan Hess of AREVA, and Marine Debris with Nicholas Mallos of Ocean Conservancy.

From conserving energy and improving the quality of our drinking water to understanding the impact of the Gulf of Mexico oil disaster, the Water Planet Challenge’s extensive collection of Action Guides, videos, lesson plans and service-learning materials helps educators and their students affect change one classroom, one community at a time. Water Planet Challenge Action Guides and resources are provided at no cost to students, educators, and community leaders through a partnership with Discovery Education. Primary funding for the Water Planet Challenge is provided by the Toyota U.S.A. Foundation.

Hot Topics—In the Wake of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident—One Year Later

One year ago, a devastating earthquake and tsunami rocked Japan causing untold damage and human suffering. The clean up and recovery efforts continue to this day, within the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the Northeast coastal region of Japan, and the country as a whole. Among the many shocking aftermaths is the 3-4 million tons of debris that washed into the ocean.

EarthEcho presents two Hot Topic Interviews on this topic:

NUCLEAR ENERGY—In the Wake of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident
Susan Hess of AREVA Inc., offers a review of what occurred on March 11, 2011, and how this impacts the future of nuclear energy. AREVA supplies energy solutions for power generation with less carbon. AREVA's unique integrated offering to utilities covers every stage of the fuel cycle, nuclear reactor design and construction and related services. The group is also expanding in renewable energies—wind, solar, bioenergies, energy storage – to be one of the top three in this sector worldwide in 2012. To learn more about AREVA visit www.Areva.com. AREVA is a member of EarthEcho International’s Corporate Advisory Board.

MARINE DEBRIS—In the Wake of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident
Nicholas Mallos of Ocean Conservancy provides an overview of the growing concern regarding the tsunami-generated marine debris and the everyday debris that pollutes our waters. Ocean Conservancy is the world's foremost advocate for the oceans. The organization seeks to inform, inspire and empower people to speak and act for the oceans through science-based advocacy, research and public education. Ocean Conservancy, headquartered in Washington, D.C., has offices in Florida, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Pacific, with support from more than half a million members and volunteers. To learn more about Ocean Conservancy visit www.oceanconservancy.org. EarthEcho International’s co-founder and president Philippe Cousteau serves on Ocean Conservancy’s Board of Directors.

Let us know what Hot Topics you are interested in seeing by emailing suggestions to info@earthecho.org.

For more information, click here.

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