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Watch Live: 'The Future' Ice Sculpture Exposes Reality of Climate Change

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Watch Live: 'The Future' Ice Sculpture Exposes Reality of Climate Change

Watch livestream here, Sunday, Sept. 21 starting at 10 a.m.:

'The Future' Ice Sculpture Exposes Reality of Climate

If you're in New York for the People's Climate March and see a giant chunk of ice, don't worry—the climate hasn't changed that much yet. It's only art. Installation/public art creators Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese, who work together as LigoranoReese, will be installing a 3,000 pound ice sculpture at Broadway and 23rd at Flatiron North Plaza on Sunday morning. EcoWatch will be livestreaming the event, starting at 10 a.m. sponsored by livestream.

A rendering of Dawn of the Anthropocene. Art creators Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese will install this ice sculpture at Broadway and 23rd at Flatiron North Plaza on Sunday morning. EcoWatch will be livestreaming the event, starting at 10 a.m.

"Dawn of the Anthropocene," a reference to man's increased impact on the world, features the words "The Future" and will slowly melt to emphasize the impact of global warming. It's the latest in a series of such "temporary monuments" that team has done to call attention to political and social issues.

"When you begin to witness the rapid changes occurring on the planet, rising temperatures, increasing droughts and the extinction of vast numbers of species, you think about loss and disappearance," said Reese. "Ice is the perfect material for bringing awareness of what that kind of change means."

The artists will photograph and film the disappearance of their ice sculpture and show the livestream on their website.

“This event is part sculpture, part installation, part performance and an internet media event," said Ligorano. "But most of all, we make art for social change, installing temporary public sculptures to mark important historical events. The NYC Climate Summit is that and more.”

Watch below as the letter F in future is being made:

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