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WATCH LIVE STREAM: The Lobster Boat Blockade's Climate Change Defense

Climate

Last summer, Jay O’Hara and Ken Ward anchored their lobster boat in the path of a 40,000 ton coal freighter on its way to deliver coal to the largest coal plant in the Northeast. At their trial last month, they argued that their actions were necessary to prevent the greater danger of climate change, leading District Attorney Sam Sutter to drop their criminal charges because “climate change is one of the gravest crises the planet has ever faced.”

On Monday, Oct. 27 from 6 - 7:30 p.m., learn more about this incredible story and the role of civil disobedience in defense of the climate by watching this panel discussion, hosted by Fossil Free MIT.

Watch the live stream here starting Monday, Oct. 27 at 6 p.m.:

Live streaming video by Ustream

Speakers include:

Jay O’Hara is a Quaker and a native of Cape Cod. Inspired by Wendell Berry, he moved back to his home town in 2007 to pursue a faithful response to the climate crisis. He is the founder of Climate Summer, a two-month experiential sustainability, organizing and liberation experience for college students. O’Hara lives a life of radical simplicity and works part-time as a sailmaker.

Ken Ward has a 35-year record of leadership in climate and environmental activism. Through a variety of positions—founding president of the National Environmental Law Center, co-founder of Green Corps and the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, and former deputy director of Greenpeace USA—he has advocated for climate action that matches the urgency and magnitude of the climate crisis and that goes beyond the bounds of mainstream environmentalism.

District Attorney Sam Sutter is known statewide for his policies that have drastically reduced illegal gun violence in Southeastern Massachusetts, for his community volunteer initiatives, and for a record of solving cold case homicides. In recent weeks, Sutter’s handling of the Lobster Boat Trial has garnered national attention for his political leadership on climate change.

Marla Marcum is director of programs at the Better Future Project, a Cambridge-based nonprofit that accelerates the growth of a grassroots movement to address the climate crisis and make a just transition away from fossil fuels. The current director of Climate Summer and chair of the Climate Change Task Force of the New England Conference of the United Methodist Church, Marcum organized community and legal support for the Lobster Boat Blockade and Trial.

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