Quantcast

Watch Jon Stewart Welcome His Newest Advertiser: The Koch Brothers

Climate

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart traveled to Texas this week to broadcast from Austin, offering Texas-based guests and commentary. But one advertiser that cropped up on the show this week may be having second thoughts.

"The past couple of nights we've noticed there's a new advertiser on the Daily Show program," said host Stewart. "Let's meet our new sponsor."

Cue: an upbeat ad about the wonders of modern fossil fuel-based industry from—the Koch Brothers.

"Who are these lovable scamp Koch Brothers?" asked Stewart, before he rolled news footage revealing among other things that "The billionaire brothers are expected to spend some $290 million these midterms, mostly through their complicated web of dark money organizations."

Saying that somehow made the ad less inspiring, Stewart said, "To welcome them to the Daily Show advertising family we did make some minor adjustments." Those "minor adjustments" undoubtedly caused some gnashing of teeth at Koch Industries corporate headquarters in nearby Kansas.

The revised ad used some of the original's cheerful graphics and a similarly honey-voiced female narrator cooing, "You won't always see our names on our campaign ads because the politicians we own say that's OK. With our heartfelt devotion to fossil fuels, we make your planet warmer and your water more flammable while lubricating your birds and rearranging your polar bears."

 YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Must-See Video: Jon Stewart Tackles Climate Deniers in Congress

Dark Money Documentary Exposes Koch Brothers' Spending Secrets

Koch Brothers Are Largest Lease Holders in Alberta Tar Sands

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A boy gives an impromptu speech about him not wanting to die in the next 10 years during the protest on July 15. The Scottish wing of the Extinction Rebellion environmental group of Scotland locked down Glasgow's Trongate for 12 hours in protest of climate change. Stewart Kirby / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

It's important to remember that one person can make a difference. From teenagers to world-renowned scientists, individuals are inspiring positive shifts around the world. Maybe you won't become a hard-core activist, but this list of people below can inspire simple ways to kickstart better habits. Here are seven people advocating for a better planet.

Read More Show Less
A group of wind turbines in a field in Banffshire, Northeast Scotland. Universal Images Group / Getty Images

Scotland produced enough power from wind turbines in the first half of 2019, that it could power Scotland twice over. Put another way, it's enough energy to power all of Scotland and most of Northern England, according to the BBC — an impressive step for the United Kingdom, which pledged to be carbon neutral in 30 years.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Beekeeper Jeff Anderson works with members of his family in this photo from 2014. He once employed all of his adult children but can no longer afford to do so. CHRIS JORDAN-BLOCH / EARTHJUSTICE

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

It's been a particularly terrible summer for bees. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it is allowing the bee-killing pesticide sulfoxaflor back on the market. And just a few weeks prior, the USDA announced it is suspending data collection for its annual honeybee survey, which tracks honeybee populations across the U.S., providing critical information to farmers and scientists.

Read More Show Less

tommaso79 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Rachel Licker

As a new mom, I've had to think about heat safety in many new ways since pregnant women and young children are among the most vulnerable to extreme heat.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

It's easy to get confused about which foods are healthy and which aren't.

Read More Show Less
Maximum heat indices expected in the continental U.S. on Saturday July 20. NOAA WPC

A dangerous heat wave is expected to boil much of the Central and Eastern U.S. beginning Wednesday, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who was appointed by President Gerald Ford in 1975, was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama on May 29, 2012. MANDEL NGAN / AFP / GettyImages

John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court Justice who wrote the opinion granting environmental agencies the power to regulate greenhouse gases, died Tuesday at the age of 99. His decision gave the U.S. government important legal tools for fighting the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less