Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch Critically-Acclaimed 'Momenta' Now Available Online for Free

Climate
Watch Critically-Acclaimed 'Momenta' Now Available Online for Free

Momenta, a film which EcoWatch ranked as one of the 10 best documentaries of 2013, is now available online for free. The film brings awareness to a Pacific Northwest coal project that could threaten the global environment on a scale larger than the Keystone XL pipeline. A collaboration between Plus M Productions and Protect Our Winters, the documentary tells the story of those living along the coal export trail and the project's global environmental implications.

Protestors in Portland Oregon made the shape of the state of Oregon and voiced their opposition to coal exports. Photo credit: Momenta Project

The fight to stop these coal companies continues today. American demand for coal is declining so coal companies plan to extract 140 million pounds of coal per year from the Powder River Basin and ship it to rapidly expanding Asian markets via ports in Washington and Oregon, according to Spiltboard Magazine.

Each day, more than 18 mile-and-a-half-long trains, laden with Powder River coal, travel from Wyoming and Montana through hundreds of small towns to ports in the Pacific Northwest, leaving arsenic and mercury laden coal dust in their wake. The near-constant stream of escaping coal dust imposes toxic environmental pollutants and a myriad of health risks to nearby communities.

The film features interviews with prominent experts and environmental activists, including Bill McKibben and Jeremy Jones, a professional snowboarder, activist and founder of Protect our Winters. Through thoughtful interviews and breathtaking cinematography, the documentary unveils the coal project’s devastating potential.

The gravity of the crisis cannot be understated. “That coal has to stay in the ground," said McKibben. "You can’t make the math of climate change work if you get the huge coal deposits of the Powder River Basin out and pour them into the atmosphere.”

Watch the movie here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Oscar Nominated ‘Virunga’ Instrumental in Protecting Africa’s Oldest National Park

8 Reasons to Be Optimistic About the Climate Movement in 2015

Study Finds Lower Pesticide Levels in People Who Eat Organic Produce

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less