Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch Colbert Say Goodbye to Fossil Fuels

Climate
Watch Colbert Say Goodbye to Fossil Fuels

Last night on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Colbert talked about the Paris Agreement. At first, he seemed thrilled about the outcome. "Whoo! The world will stay hospitable for human life," he cheered. Then he cracked, "that's setting the bar about as low as it could possibly go."

Colbert said, "It's about time," noting how unseasonably warm it's been in New York City and the rest of the eastern U.S. lately. He claimed he did his Christmas shopping in flip flops and a halter top.

In a nod to the agreement, which requires phasing out fossil fuels soon after mid-century, Colbert said goodbye to his friend, a barrel of oil named Crudy Giuliani, by dancing to Total Eclipse of the Heart.

Watch the segment here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Why is it so Warm in December?

Bernie Slams Trump on The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon

Leonardo DiCaprio: ‘Do Not Wait Another Day’ to Move to 100% Renewable Energy

Donald Trump Attacked by Eagle Named Uncle Sam, GIF Goes Viral

Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less
Scientists are studying barley, the key ingredient in beer. Ridofranz / Getty Images

Researchers at UC-Riverside are investigating how barley, a key ingredient in beer, survives in such a wide variety of climates with hopes of learning what exactly makes it so resilient across climates.

Read More Show Less