Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch Chris Christie Angrily Refute His Climate Denial

Climate
Watch Chris Christie Angrily Refute His Climate Denial

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie last weekend flatly denied comments he made earlier this month that “breathing” contributes to climate change—and seemed to make a first step toward endorsing policy solutions that will build a clean energy economy.

During an Aug. 4 meet and greet in Manchester, New Hampshire, Christie was filmed telling Granite State voters that “breathing” contributed to climate change. This weekend when a NextGen Climate volunteer asked Christie whether he stood by these comments, Christie called the statement “ridiculous,” denied ever making the comments and then touted his record of supporting solar energy in New Jersey.

Watch the video of Christie’s comments during both events:

 

When it comes to addressing climate change, Christie is right to walk back his climate change denial and instead focus on the importance of concrete solutions that combat climate change, grow our economy and create jobs. As governor of New Jersey—one of the top ten solar producing states in the country—Christie rightly cites that private business and government should work together to create jobs and build a clean energy economy.

Now, as he campaigns for president, it’s time for Christie to lay out a concrete plan to power our country with more than 50 percent clean energy by 2030 and 100 percent clean energy by 2050. In New Hampshire and across the country, a majority of Americans (69 percent) and Republicans (54 percent) back this ambitious, yet attainable goal.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Bernie Sanders: The Environment Deserves a Debate

White House Fires Back at Charles Koch

Another Poll Shows Bernie Beating Hillary

Why Is the World Obsessed With Donald Trump?

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists' "Doomsday Clock" — an estimate of how close humanity is to the apocalypse — remains at 100 seconds to zero for 2021. Eva Hambach / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

One hundred seconds to midnight. That's how close humanity is to the apocalypse, and it's as close as the world has ever been, according to Wednesday's annual announcement from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, a group that has been running its "Doomsday Clock" since the early years of the nuclear age in 1947.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The 13th North Atlantic right whale calf with their mother off Wassaw Island, Georgia on Jan. 19, 2010. @GeorgiaWild, under NOAA permit #20556

North Atlantic right whales are in serious trouble, but there is hope. A total of 14 new calves of the extremely endangered species have been spotted this winter between Florida and North Carolina.

Read More Show Less

Trending

There are new lifestyle "medicines" that are free that doctors could be prescribing for all their patients. Marko Geber / Getty Images

By Yoram Vodovotz and Michael Parkinson

The majority of Americans are stressed, sleep-deprived and overweight and suffer from largely preventable lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Being overweight or obese contributes to the 50% of adults who suffer high blood pressure, 10% with diabetes and additional 35% with pre-diabetes. And the costs are unaffordable and growing. About 90% of the nearly $4 trillion Americans spend annually for health care in the U.S. is for chronic diseases and mental health conditions. But there are new lifestyle "medicines" that are free that doctors could be prescribing for all their patients.

Read More Show Less
Candles spell out, "Fight for 1 point 5" in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany on Dec. 11, 2020, in reference to 1.5°C of Earth's warming. The event was organized by the Fridays for Future climate movement. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Taking an unconventional approach to conduct the largest-ever poll on climate change, the United Nations' Development Program and the University of Oxford surveyed 1.2 million people across 50 countries from October to December of 2020 through ads distributed in mobile gaming apps.

Read More Show Less
A monarch butterfly is perched next to an adult caterpillar on a milkweed plant, the only plant the monarch will lay eggs on and the caterpillar will eat. Cathy Keifer / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

Fall used to be the time when millions of monarch butterflies in North America would journey upwards of 2,000 miles to warmer winter habitat.

Read More Show Less