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Watch Chris Christie Angrily Refute His Climate Denial

Climate

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie last weekend flatly denied comments he made earlier this month that “breathing” contributes to climate change—and seemed to make a first step toward endorsing policy solutions that will build a clean energy economy.

During an Aug. 4 meet and greet in Manchester, New Hampshire, Christie was filmed telling Granite State voters that “breathing” contributed to climate change. This weekend when a NextGen Climate volunteer asked Christie whether he stood by these comments, Christie called the statement “ridiculous,” denied ever making the comments and then touted his record of supporting solar energy in New Jersey.

Watch the video of Christie’s comments during both events:

 

When it comes to addressing climate change, Christie is right to walk back his climate change denial and instead focus on the importance of concrete solutions that combat climate change, grow our economy and create jobs. As governor of New Jersey—one of the top ten solar producing states in the country—Christie rightly cites that private business and government should work together to create jobs and build a clean energy economy.

Now, as he campaigns for president, it’s time for Christie to lay out a concrete plan to power our country with more than 50 percent clean energy by 2030 and 100 percent clean energy by 2050. In New Hampshire and across the country, a majority of Americans (69 percent) and Republicans (54 percent) back this ambitious, yet attainable goal.

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