Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch Bill Nye Put His Climate Money Where His Mouth Is

Climate

Bill Nye, an outspoken proponent of man-made climate change, has taken on meteorologist and well-known climate denier Joe Bastardi in a new StarTalk video.

"We have real data and you can see the world is getting warmer," Nye said. "These five curves were produced by five independent organizations and they all got the same answer."

The clip was posted in response to a November 2015 editorial Bastardi wrote for The Patriot Post in which he described Nye as an "agenda-driven zealot [rather] than a man of science."

The WeatherBell chief forecaster also challenged "The Science Guy" to the following three points:

1. Explain why there’s no linkage in the entire known CO2-temperature history of the planet.

2. Explain the lack of warming in real-time temperature data, and why so far I have been right.

3. Make your forecast. You claim to be a leader yet refuse to take a stand. Instead you sit in the stands and never allow what you are saying to be verified. What kind of science is that?

Nye not only took on Bastardi's challenge, he's also putting a total of $20,000 on the line that 2016 will be in the top 10 hottest years ever recorded and that 2010-2020 will be the hottest decade ever recorded.

In the video, Nye points out flaws in the graphs Bastardi used on his Patriot Post opinion piece and also explained that the weatherman chose to highlight the years 2005 and 2006 which followed an El Niño, which causes temperatures to rise and fall in a short period of time.

"So when you start when it's warm of course it's going to go down a little bit at first," he said. "I'm not sure why you would choose to present the graph this way."

Nye then quotes Upton Sinclair who said, "It’s hard to get a man to believe something when his salary depends on his not believing it."

As a side note, Nye brought up Bastardi's appearances at events hosted by the American Coal Council, the Nebraska Propane Gas Association and the North American Gas Forum suggesting that Bastardi has ties to the fossil fuel industry.

"Where you speak is your business but it also seems to be your business—telling your audiences what they want to hear," he said.

“So come on, champ,” Nye tells Bastardi, who is a weightlifter. “Show us how tough you are.”

This isn't the first time Nye has made a big bet on climate change. As the Huffington Post noted, Nye has now clocked up a total of $60,000 on bets against climate deniers.

Earlier this month, the television presenter bet Marc Morano, of the conservative think tank the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow (CFACT) that Earth is getting hotter.

Morano turned down the challenge and told DeSmog it was “silly” to take a bet when it was “obvious” the official records would show more global warming.

This isn't the first time Nye and Bastardi traded barbs. The two debated man-made climate change in this 2010 The O’Reilly Factor segment:

In response to the video, Bastardi has sent out a string of tweets at Nye:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Bill Nye vs. Sarah Palin on Climate Change: Who Do You Believe?

On Earth Day 150 World Leaders to Sign Paris Climate Agreement

Scientists Start to Look at Ground Beneath Their Feet for Solution to Climate Change

Dalai Lama, Archbishop Tutu Among 250 Faith Leaders Urging Immediate Action on Climate Change

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

U.S. President Donald Trump listens as Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Just over a month after proclaiming that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. would soon "be down to close to zero," President Donald Trump said during a press briefing on the White House lawn Sunday that limiting U.S. deaths from the pandemic to between 100,000 and 200,000 people would mean his administration and the country as a whole did "a very good job."

Read More Show Less
Dicamba is having a devastating impact in Arkansas and neighboring states. A farmer in Mississippi County, Arkansas looks at rows of soybean plants affected by dicamba. The Washington Post / Getty Images

Documents unearthed in a lawsuit brought by a Missouri farmer who claimed that Monsanto and German chemical maker BASF's dicamba herbicide ruined his peach orchard revealed that the two companies knew their new agricultural seed and chemical system would likely damage many U.S. farms, according to documents seen by The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee and other leaders speak to the press on March 28, 2020 in Seattle. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Washington State has seen a slowdown in the infection rate of the novel coronavirus, for now, suggesting that early containment strategies have been effective, according to the Seattle NBC News affiliate.

Read More Show Less
A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

Read More Show Less

By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

Read More Show Less