Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch a Phony Petitioner Lie to Residents of Texas Town That Could Soon Ban Fracking

Energy

Tired of chemically-induced water and the potential for Earthquakes, Denton, TX officials are on the brink of banning fracking in their community.

The issue faces a vote Tuesday evening at a city council. Officials can either adopt the ban within city limits as an ordinance or include it on the November election ballot.

Companies operating in the city obviously oppose such a ban and are likely surprised that the city is actually considering standing up for its residents in lieu of the tax dollars the city has enjoyed in recent years. As a result, companies have surged ahead with a misinformation campaign, and anti-fracking activist Sharon Wilson has been there to document it all.

This week she caught a faux petitioner parading around town luring people to sign documents that would benefit fracking companies instead of supporting a ban, as he claims.

"Notice that he starts off by implying his petition will  ‘put some kind of bans' on fracking. Then he claims their ‘regulations' would keep fracking ‘outside city limits,' which is exactly what the FrackFreeDenton petition is about," wrote Wilson, known online as "TX Sharon."

"This guy clearly doesn’t know anything about fracking or Denton but he does know he needs my signature on that page to get paid."

According to the Denton Record-Chronicle, some petition workers like the man in the above video are getting paid $2 per signature—possibly by a national firm with a fracking interest. Denton Taxpayers for a Strong Economy, the name of the company on one worker's check, registered with the Texas Ethics Commission. Pass the Ban and Denton First are the only entities that have filed campaign finance paperwork with the Denton city secretary. Pass the Ban supports the ban, while Denton First filed a petition to change liquor laws.

"The fracking industry is waging a shock-and-awe attack on residents of Denton, TX," Wilson wrote. "After a decade of being bullied by an industry that refuses to follow any rules, residents are saying, ‘We’ve had enough.'"

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A woman walks to her train in Grand Central Terminal as New York City attempts to slow down the spread of coronavirus through social distancing on March 27. John Lamparski / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A council representing more than 800,000 doctors across the U.S. signed a letter Friday imploring President Donald Trump to reverse his call for businesses to reopen by April 12, warning that the president's flouting of the guidance of public health experts could jeopardize the health of millions of Americans and throw hospitals into even more chaos as they fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less