Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch a Climate Denier Label IPCC Report as UN's ‘Perverse Priorities' on Fox News

Climate
Watch a Climate Denier Label IPCC Report as UN's ‘Perverse Priorities' on Fox News

Unfortunately, Fox News was not playing an early April Fools' joke this week when anchor Neil Cavuto began a segment by attacking the United Nations for releasing the most groundbreaking report on climate change you may have ever seen.

It's understandable if you did think it was a prank. After all, seconds into the discussion, guest Claudia Rosett of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies deemed the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report as an example of the U.N.'s "perverse priorities."

No, there's nothing more perverse than educating the world on the prospects of migration, resource depletion and global warming.

Watch the clip here: 

Media Matters for America examined the reactions of cable news networks to the IPCC report. While Fox, known for its climate denial, actually spent more time talking about the report's implications than CNN, that time was spent blasting the organization. Curiously, Cavuto and Rosett criticize the U.N. for prioritizing the IPCC in favor of potential conflicts, even though the report spends ample time discussing the resource wars that could arise from ignoring climate change.

Graphic credit: Media Matters For America

“We live in an era of man-made climate change,” said Vicente Barros, co-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Working Group II, which compiled the report. “In many cases, we are not prepared for the climate-related risks that we already face. Investments in better preparation can pay dividends both for the present and for the future.”

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Groundbreaking UN Report Warns Climate Change a Threat to Global Security and Mankind

13 Useful Tips for Climate Action From the IPCC Report

——–

An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less