Quantcast

Want to Get Off the Grid and Live in Harmony With Nature? Build an Earthship

Business

Earthship homes are off-grid dwellings that are some of the greenest and most economical buildings in the world. They are made from recycled materials such as glass bottles, old tires, reclaimed wood and plenty of elbow grease, and can be built anywhere in the world, according to the founder of Earthship Biotecture Michael Reynolds.

Reynolds, who has been building Earthships for 40 years, argued in the video below on PBS's The Good Stuff that we can get off the grid entirely and generate our own electricity if we just redesign our homes. He compared a modern home to someone being hooked up to life support in a hospital. An Earthship, Reynolds said, is like that person getting up and walking out of the hospital.

Reynolds advocates for a move away from our current centralized infrastructure—power, water, sewage—which he called "archaic," and towards sustainable buildings that run on renewable energy.

An Earthship home, which you can rent to check one out, "utilizes sustainable construction techniques so that it doesn't need to be connected to the grid," The Good Stuff explained. "It provides its own heating and cooling, captures and recycles its own water, produces its own food and generates its own electricity."

Just how exactly does it do all that? Watch here to find out:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Huge Hydropower Plant to Harness Seawater and Solar Power in South America’s Driest Desert

World’s First Solar-Hydrogen Residential Development Is 100% Self-Sustaining

Greenhouses: The Solution for Year-Round Local Food?

Renewables Saw More Money Invested and More Capacity Added in 2015 Than Ever Before

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Farm waste being prepared for composting. USDA / Lance Cheung

By Tim Lydon

Can the United States make progress on its food-waste problems? Cities like San Francisco — and a growing list of actions by the federal government — show that it's possible.

Read More
Pexels

By C. Michael White

More than two-thirds of Americans take dietary supplements. The vast majority of consumers — 84 percent — are confident the products are safe and effective.

Read More
Sponsored
Pexels

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Coconut oil has become quite trendy in recent years.

Read More
The common giant tree frog from Madagascar is one of many species impacted by recent climate change. John J. Wiens / EurekAlert!

By Jessica Corbett

The human-caused climate crisis could cause the extinction of 30 percent of the world's plant and animal species by 2070, even accounting for species' abilities to disperse and shift their niches to tolerate hotter temperatures, according to a study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read More
SolStock / Moment / Getty Images

By Tyler Wells Lynch

For years, Toni Genberg assumed a healthy garden was a healthy habitat. That's how she approached the landscaping around her home in northern Virginia. On trips to the local gardening center, she would privilege aesthetics, buying whatever looked pretty, "which was typically ornamental or invasive plants," she said. Then, in 2014, Genberg attended a talk by Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware. "I learned I was actually starving our wildlife," she said.

Read More