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Want to Catch a Meteor Shower? Here's How

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Want to Catch a Meteor Shower? Here's How

There's nothing like watching a meteor shower. If you haven't had the chance to see meteors streak across the sky yet this season, here's how you can.

A Delta Aquarid meteor shoots across the top left of the picture.Photo credit: Mike Lewinski, Flickr

The Delta Aquarids, an annual meteor shower that typically peaks around late July, is happening right now. The event started around July 12 but will peak next week around July 28 and 29. Delta Aquarids create unusually long tails due to their angle of entry into the atmosphere, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

At the shower's peak, it is possible to see 20 meteors an hour. The Delta Aquarids do tend to favor the Southern Hemisphere, but observers in the Northern Hemisphere can still catch a spectacular show.

The Delta Aquarids will continue until Aug. 23, overlapping with the Perseid meteor shower, one of the most popular meteor showers. The Perseid meteors are associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle. They receive their name from their point of entry into the atmosphere, which lies in the constellation Perseus.

The Perseids tend to peak in mid-August.

So how can you catch a glimpse of these showers?

The best time to watch for the shooting stars is around 2 or 3 a.m. Delta Aquarids will be better seen in a dark sky, free of moonlight and artificial lights, Science Alert reported. But if you still can't catch a glimpse, the online observatory Slooh will provide a live broadcast of the shower from the Canary Islands.

The broadcast will also include astronomers discussing the shower and answering questions from the public.

Watch the live broadcast below:

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