Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Want to Catch a Meteor Shower? Here's How

Popular

There's nothing like watching a meteor shower. If you haven't had the chance to see meteors streak across the sky yet this season, here's how you can.

A Delta Aquarid meteor shoots across the top left of the picture.Photo credit: Mike Lewinski, Flickr

The Delta Aquarids, an annual meteor shower that typically peaks around late July, is happening right now. The event started around July 12 but will peak next week around July 28 and 29. Delta Aquarids create unusually long tails due to their angle of entry into the atmosphere, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

At the shower's peak, it is possible to see 20 meteors an hour. The Delta Aquarids do tend to favor the Southern Hemisphere, but observers in the Northern Hemisphere can still catch a spectacular show.

The Delta Aquarids will continue until Aug. 23, overlapping with the Perseid meteor shower, one of the most popular meteor showers. The Perseid meteors are associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle. They receive their name from their point of entry into the atmosphere, which lies in the constellation Perseus.

The Perseids tend to peak in mid-August.

So how can you catch a glimpse of these showers?

The best time to watch for the shooting stars is around 2 or 3 a.m. Delta Aquarids will be better seen in a dark sky, free of moonlight and artificial lights, Science Alert reported. But if you still can't catch a glimpse, the online observatory Slooh will provide a live broadcast of the shower from the Canary Islands.

The broadcast will also include astronomers discussing the shower and answering questions from the public.

Watch the live broadcast below:

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less