Quantcast

Lawsuit Filed Against Walmart for Claiming 'Cage-Free' Eggs

Food
16:9clue / Flickr

By Dan Nosowitz

A lawsuit has been filed in a California district court against two of the biggest companies in the country: Walmart and Cal-Maine Foods. The lawsuit claims that Walmart and Cal-Maine—the latter is one of the biggest egg producers in the U.S.—lied to customers about the treatment of hens whose eggs were sold at Walmart. The alleged lie? The packaging claimed "outdoor access," yet the birds are not permitted to go outside.


The background of this lawsuit: the original organic legislation is decades old, and in the later years of the Obama administration, lawmakers attempted to close some of its loopholes. One of those was "access to the outdoors." Actual access to the outdoors, with dirt and grass, is expensive to set up and maintain, so some big egg producers instead opt for the bare minimum that gets them the certification to sell eggs at that precious organic premium. In many cases, that means a setup like a room with walls, a ceiling, and a concrete floor that happens to have screened windows counts.

The Trump administration last month hurled that legislation in the garbage, which has angered organic growers and activists who see screened-in porches as a misleading perversion of what consumers think organics really are. Walmart previously announced that it plans to sell only cage-free eggs by 2025, but if those eggs are only cage-free in this legal sense, is that really much of an achievement?

This lawsuit feels more like a protest than an actionable attack; it's not at all clear that Cal-Maine's "outdoor access" is illegal, despite being ridiculous according to common sense. What is clear is that consumers have expectations for the words "organic" and "outdoor access," and this lawsuit is an example of their standing up and saying so.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pixabay

By Claire L. Jarvis

A ruckus over biofuels has been brewing in Iowa.

Read More Show Less
Serena and Venus Williams have been known to follow a vegan diet. Edwin Martinez / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Whitney E. Akers

  • "The Game Changers" is a new documentary on Netflix that posits a vegan diet can improve athletic performance in professional athletes.

  • Limited studies available show that the type of diet — plant-based or omnivorous — doesn't give you an athletic advantage.

  • We talked to experts about what diet is the best for athletic performance.

Packed with record-setting athletes displaying cut physiques and explosive power, "The Game Changers," a new documentary on Netflix, has a clear message: Vegan is best.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
An illegally trafficked tiger skull and pelt. Ryan Moehring / USFWS

By John R. Platt

When it comes to solving problems related to wildlife trade, there are an awful lot of "sticky widgets."

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be both good and bad.

On one hand, it helps your body defend itself from infection and injury. On the other hand, chronic inflammation can lead to weight gain and disease.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less