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Every quarter, the nonprofit Green America gives out their People & Planet Award and a $5,000 cash prize to three businesses that practice the best in sustainability in categories such as community development, green travel, worker empowerment and more. This winter's 10 finalists have been recognized for their efforts in advancing clean energy. You can help decide the winners by voting for your three favorites before 8 p.m. EST, March 2.

1. Organic Transit (Durham, North Carolina)

Organic Transit builds solar-powered ELF (“Electric, Light and Fun”) bikes that can go up to 30 miles per hour and comes with headlights, turn signals, a roof and plenty of cargo space, The Atlantic’s CityLab reported. The company says that if their ELF is used in place of a car, it could prevent up to six tons of CO2 from spewing into the atmosphere each year.

2. Rain Catchers (Kernersville, North Carolina)

Addressing global water shortages, food insecurity and climate changeRain Catchers secures quality water supply through rain water harvesting and storing it below ground. They practice innovative water harvesting solutions, such as solar pumping from any water source, storm water management, UV filtration and more.

3. SkyBar (Tucson, Arizona)

Sky Bar is the only solar-powered bar on Earth and also shares its 300 solar panels with its sister restaurant, Brooklyn Pizza Company. When it gets dark, the bar offers astronomy shows along with deep space images displayed from their own telescopes.

4. Sunlight Solar Systems (Salt Lake City, Utah)

Locally owned Sunlight Solar Systems has installed more than 250 residential, commercial and industrial projects since 2008. Their green practices are from top to bottom—their office and warehouse is a net-zero building and they recycle everything from glass, cardboard, metals and plastics.

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5. Technicians for Sustainability (Tucson, Arizona)

Since 2003, Technicians for Sustainability has installed more than 9 megawatts of solar in Southern Arizona. The company specializes in renewable energy and sustainable technologies for residential and commercial settings, including solar electric and solar hot water.

"Solar in Arizona is a ‘no brainer.’ To me, the cost was like buying a small car, but unlike a car, solar pays for itself after a few years and offsets your electricity bills for the next 25 years,” said Technicians For Sustainability customer Marri. Photo credit: Technicians For Sustainability

6. Clean Power Perks in (Boston, Massachusetts) 

Clean Power Perks is a web-based platform that helps people find clean energy brands and also rewards them with exclusive deals and discounts from brands like prAna, Preserve, Emmy’s Organics, Timberland and other businesses that use clean energy.

7. Ethical Electric in (District of Columbia) 

Energy company Ethical Electric allows their customers to buy 100 percent clean power from renewable sources like wind and solar. In 2014 alone, Ethical Electric's customers have abated 605 millions pounds of CO2, the equivalent of preventing the burning of 294 million pounds of coal, taking 57,773 cars off the road or planting 7 million trees, the company says.

8. Envision Solar (San Diego, California)

Envision Solar aims to transform parking lots into solar power plants that can also charge electric vehicles at the same time. The company creates solar tree structures and the world’s only transportable solar-powered electric vehicle charging station, called the EV ARC.

9. Maple Hill Farm Inn and Conference Center (Hallowell, Maine)

It's not your average B&B, that's for sure. Maple Hill Farm Inn runs on solar and wind power, heats with a sustainable wood-pellet boiler, uses LED lighting and is planning an EV-charging station. "We have always been committed to protect Maine’s beautiful environment (which is why our guests come to stay with us) and to tread as lightly on the Earth as we can," the company says. "We have always used local and Maine-made products, minimized our use of harmful chemicals, reduced our solid waste and shared our commitment to sustainability with all our guests."

Maine's first certified Environmental Leader green lodging and conference center with large solar electric array, solar hot water and wind turbine. Photo Credit: Maple Hill Farm Inn and Conference Center

10. NativeEnergy (Burlington, Vermont)

NativeEnergy provides businesses and individuals the opportunity to invest in new clean energy in the U.S. and clean water in developing countries. The company helps businesses and individuals identify and reduce their greenhouse gas pollution and attain their sustainability goals. Clients include eBay, Keurig Green Mountain, Ben & Jerry's, Interface, Stonyfield Farm, Esurance and National Geographic. The company will dedicate the $5,000 prize to helping implement the Ghana Clean water project, which will help offset 325 metric tons of CO2, the equivalent of taking about 68 passenger cars off the road for a year.

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