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Volunteer Opportunities

The following volunteer opportunities are available at EcoWatch :

  • Outreach at Community Events - EcoWatch tables at community events. We often need volunteers to help at the table and we want to increase are visibility and table at more events per year. If you are interested in tabling at an upcoming event, let me know and I will contact you about a month before our next event. If you know of any events coming up that you think would be a good venue for EcoWatch to table at and want to coordinate it, that would be great. We are interested in a volunteer becoming an events coordinator. If you are interested in taking on that role, please let me know. When you table at events you tell participants about the publication and the mission of our organization and encourage them to take a copy of our current and back issues of the paper.
  • Fundraising - We are looking for a volunteer to take on the role as fundraising coordinator and work on an annual fundraising event for our organization. This person would coordinate a silent auction and the actual event itself. We are also looking for volunteers who are interested in being on the fundraising committee for our organization.

    We often do other types of fundraising drives and are looking for volunteers to help. Please let me know if you are interested.

  • Office Help - We need help in the office after we get each issue back from the printer (six times per year). We do a subscriber and distributor mailing. If you are interested in spending half a day helping with these mailings, let me know and I will call you and let you know the next time we will do this mailing.
  • Distribution - We can always use help with distribution. EcoWatch is distributed by a company that gets the paper in more than 2,000 locations throughout 14 counties of Northeast Ohio. But, if we do not distribute in your area and want to help with distribution we are happy to mail you a bundle (about 100 papers) to your address and you can distribute the papers at your local library, laundromat, meetings, retail shops, movie theaters, etc. We pay for the postage, so you just need to be willing to get the papers out in your community. If you do live in Northeast Ohio and want to help distribute the paper in places it is currently not being dropped off, we will provide you papers too.

    Just let us know via phone or email.

  • Board Member - EcoWatch is always looking to strengthen our board of directors. If you are interested in serving on our board, please call or email Stefanie Spear for more information.

If you are interested in any of these volunteer opportunities or have any suggestions of ways you can help, please call or email Stefanie Spear at spear@ecowatch.com or 216-387-1609.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

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By Andrew Glikson

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