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Volkswagen Group to Offer Electric Version for All 300 Models by 2030

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Volkswagen Group to Offer Electric Version for All 300 Models by 2030
Volkswagen's fully electric Microbus

The world's biggest automaker is shifting away from traditional gas guzzlers.

Volkswagen, which has been rebounding from its emissions-cheating scandal, plans to offer an electric version across the group's 300 models by 2030. The company is also rolling out 80 new electric cars under its multiple brands by 2025.


"Customers want clean vehicles. People want to have clean air, and we want to make our contribution here," Volkswagen chief Matthias Mueller told the BBC.

According to Reuters, the German company is investing more than 20 billion euros ($24 billion) in zero-emission vehicles to challenge industry disrupter, Tesla.

Volkswagen has made a push towards earth-friendlier vehicles ever since its 2015 "dieselgate" scandal, in which the company admitted that 11 million of its diesel vehicles worldwide were secretly equipped with software used to cheat on emissions tests.

But Mueller also told the BBC that the company cannot entirely ditch traditional combustion engines because the infrastructure for electric vehicles is not in place.

"There will be a coexistence between internal combustion engines and electric drive systems for a certain period—I can't tell you how long that will be," he said.

VW's announcement comes as an increasing number of countries plan to ban new diesel and gasoline cars. This week, news emerged that China, the world's biggest vehicle market, is considering a ban on the production and sale of fossil fuel cars. Earlier this month, Scotland announced plans to end the sale of new gas and diesel-powered cars by 2032 and fast-track the development of a country-wide charging network for electric vehicles. Norway is banning the sale of new gasoline- and diesel-powered cars in 2025. Germany plans to ban the internal combustion engine by 2030. India intends to be a "100 percent electric vehicle nation" by 2030. France has also set a date of 2040.

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