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Viral Video: Naming Hurricanes After Politicians Who Deny Climate Change

Climate

EcoWatch

By Laura Beans

A new campaign was kicked off yesterday, aimed at increasing awareness of climate change and its link to extreme weather. 350 Action released a video petitioning the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to change the way they name severe storms.

The WMO's current naming system randomly selects common first names to assign to storms, such as Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina. The campaign calls on the WMO to instead name the storms after actual policy makers who deny climate change, like Sen. Rubio (R-FL) and House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH).

According to 350 Action, the campaign—created in conjunction with advertising agency Barton F. Graf 9000—also features extensive facts about climate change, voting records of climate change obstructionists and more ways to get involved and spread the news. At the heart of the campaign and the site, is an actual petition to the WMO that visitors are encouraged to sign. When enough signatures are gathered, the petition will be presented to the WMO in hopes that the new naming system could become a reality.

“It’s a new day but some songs remain the same. Congress used to have tobacco addiction deniers, now it has far too many climate deniers,” said Jason Kowlaski, 350 Action policy director.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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