Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Viral Video Confronts the War on Science

Climate

In yet another case of learning nothing from history, modern society continues the war on science. "Science and society are often at odds," explains the AsapScience video, which has garnered more than 1 million views since it was published four days ago.

"Scientific discoveries like the Earth is round, that our planet revolves around the Sun or that diseases are spread through germs are all once ideas that were rejected by society," continues the narrator. "So much so that Giordano Bruno was burned at the stake for suggesting the Earth wasn't the center of the universe, and even Galileo was sentenced to house arrest for supporting the theory.

"Today, we see the rejection of scientific evidence for vaccinations leading to preventable diseases like Measles coming back after being wiped out in the year 2000. Or the rejection of the scientific evidence on climate change, despite the vast consensus among scientists."

Several of the top GOP presidential candidates, including Ted Cruz, Ben Carson and Donald Trump have all flat out denied man-made climate change. Ben Carson has even gone so far as to question the theory of evolution and says he just doesn't have "that much faith" to believe in the Big Bang theory, but says people "are welcome to believe whatever they want to believe. I’m welcome to believe what I want to believe.” Carson, who is a retired neurosurgeon no less, is speaking as if science is "no more than a religious system he has the freedom to reject," as Rebecca Leber at New Republic puts it.

Watch The War on Science video here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

John Oliver Rips Fracking Industry for its Deadly Bakken Boom, Killing One Person Every Six Weeks

2 More Fracking-Related Earthquakes Hit Oklahoma Despite New Rules Meant to Prevent Them

2.6 Billion Pounds of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Sprayed on U.S. Farmland in Past Two Decades

Disturbing Images Expose the Horrific Impact of Plastic Trash on Marine Animals

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less
Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

By Dave Cooke

So, they finally went and did it — the Trump administration just finalized a rule to undo requirements on manufacturers to improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new passenger cars and trucks. Even with the economy at the brink of a recession, they went forward with a policy they know is bad for consumers — their own analysis shows that American drivers are going to spend hundreds of dollars more in fuel as a result of this stupid policy — but they went ahead and did it anyway.

Read More Show Less

By Richard Connor

A blood test that screens for more than 50 types of cancer could help doctors treat patients at an earlier stage than previously possible, a new study shows. The method was used to screen for more than 50 types of cancer — including particularly deadly variants such as pancreatic, ovarian, bowel and brain.

Read More Show Less
Ian Sane / Flickr

Preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control showed a larger number of young people coming down with COVID-19 than first expected, with patients under the age of 45 comprising more than a third of all cases, and one in five of those patients requiring hospitalization. That also tends to be the group most likely to use e-cigarettes.

Read More Show Less