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VIDEO: The Whole World Connects the Dots

Climate
VIDEO: The Whole World Connects the Dots

350.org

By May Boeve

Just over a week ago, the world stood up to Connect the Dots on climate impacts. 5/5/12 was a beautiful, inspiring, occasionally heartbreaking day. It's hard to describe what it felt like to watch the world come together like that—but this video comes close.

If you haven't seen it yet, please take 90 seconds to watch and spread it around:

People everywhere are waking up, and we're all in this together. As more and more of us start to feel the impacts of climate change, we'll need to continue connecting the dots. These are the stories we'll carry with us as we take on the power of the fossil fuel industry over the coming months, beginning with taking away their billions in subsidies.

Thank you for stepping up and being part of this movement. We need your voices, faces and energy more than ever.

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