Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Video Shows How Helping Women Farmers Shrinks Hunger

Food
Video Shows How Helping Women Farmers Shrinks Hunger

It's been demonstrated that investing in women pays off huge dividends for their families, their children and their communities, whether it's in education, family planning or microloans to start businesses.

Across the planet, women and girl farmers play a big role in changing the food system and creating a well-nourished world. Photo credit: Food Tank

Food Tank and Global Forum on Agricultural Research (GFAR) have released a video showing how women impact farming and the food system.

Food Tank says:

Across the planet, women and girl farmers play a big role in changing the food system and creating a well-nourished world. In fact, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), approximately 43 percent of all farmers in the developing world are women. In poor and rich nations alike, they are taking on more defined roles in food and agriculture. 

The group says that increased investment in women farmers would lead to healthier children, stronger economies, and decreased world hunger.

It says:

If access to new technology and resources is made available to women farmers, yields could increase by 20 to 30 percent and could reduce the number of hungry people in world by 100 to 150 million people. While women are responsible for the majority of food production, they are also more likely to suffer from hunger during food shortages. Addressing the deep-rooted inequalities that currently prevent women from gaining equal access to tools and resources will level the playing field and help close the gender gap.

Watch the video here.

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

6 Initiatives That Empower Women in Agriculture

International Women’s Day—Celebrating the Power of Women

Saving the World One Farm at a Time

A "trash tsunami" has washed ashore on the beaches of Honduras, endangering both wildlife and the local economy.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Long-finned pilot whales are seen during a 1998 stranding in Marion Bay in Tasmania, Australia. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

More long-finned pilot whales were found stranded today on beaches in Tasmania, Australia. About 500 whales have become stranded, including at least 380 that have died, the AP reported. It is the largest mass stranding in Australia's recorded history.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A protest in solidarity with the Wetʼsuwetʼen's anti-pipeline struggle, at Canada House in Trafalgar Square on March 1, 2020 in London, England. More than 200 environmental groups had their Facebook accounts suspended days before an online solidarity protest. Ollie Millington / Getty Images

Facebook suspended more than 200 accounts belonging to environmental and Indigenous groups Saturday, casting doubt on the company's stated commitments to addressing the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Västra Hamnen neighborhood in Malmö, Sweden, runs on renewable energy. Tomas Ottosson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Harry Kretchmer

By 2030, almost a third of all the energy consumed in the European Union must come from renewable sources, according to binding targets agreed in 2018. Sweden is helping lead the way.

Read More Show Less
An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch