Quantcast

Victory for Greenpeace Campaign as LEGO Dumps Shell Oil

Climate

After an intense three-month campaign by Greenpeace that included the most viral video in its history, LEGO announced that it is ending its partnership with Shell Oil Company.

 "It's a massive victory for the million people globally who called on LEGO to stop helping Shell look like a responsible and caring company rather than a driller intent on exploiting the melting Arctic for more oil," said Greenpeace's Ian Duff. "To maintain respectability in the face of growing opposition to Arctic drilling, Shell needs to surround itself with decent and much loved brands—museums, art galleries, music festivals, sports events. LEGO's announcement is an important step towards blowing Shell's cover."

Greenpeace targeted the promotional relationship between the Danish toy company and the multinational energy giant due to Shell's extensive drilling activities in the Arctic, which threaten the area's ecosystem and fuel climate change. While the company suspended its activities there last year following legal challenges and operational mishaps, it's said it will resume drilling in 2015.

“We are determined to leave a positive impact on society and the planet that children will inherit,” said LEGO CEO Joergen Vig Knudstorp in the statement. Photo credit: Greenpeace

The Greenpeace campaign played on the warm and fuzzy association both children and adults have with the versatile, building-block toys to stage a series of attention-grabbing protests. Its video, "LEGO: Everything Is NOT Awesome," attracted nearly six million millions views and helped trigger over a million signatures on its petition. Protests also included a "play-in," where children built Arctic animals out of LEGO at Shell's London headquarters; worldwide recreations of famous protests made from LEGO; lifesize "LEGO" figures descending on a LEGO store in New york's Rockefeller Plaza; and tiny LEGO figures taking over a gas station in Denmark.

Early in the campaign, LEGO tried to punt, saying that Greenpeace should be talking instead to Shell about its Arctic drilling instead of LEGO. Yesterday it conceded.

“We are determined to leave a positive impact on society and the planet that children will inherit,” said LEGO CEO Joergen Vig Knudstorp in the statement. “We don't agree with the tactics used by Greenpeace that may have created the misunderstanding among our stakeholders about the way we operate.”

The marketing partnership between Shell and LEGO goes back to the ’60s. Since 1966, LEGO has sold sets that included Shell gas stations, race cars and tanker trucks, among other items.

A three-month campaign by Greenpeace nudged LEGO into ending a nearly 50-year partnership with Shell Oil. Photo credit: Greenpeace

“The tide is turning for these fossil fuel dinosaurs that see the melting Arctic as ripe for exploitation rather than protection," said Duff. "The message should be clear; your outdated, climate wrecking practices are no longer socially acceptable, and you need to keep away from the Arctic or face being ostracized by society.”

 YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Tell Susan G. Komen Don’t Frack With Our Health

Shell Accused of ‘Orwellian Doublethink’ in Downplaying Climate Risks to Investors

20,000+ Ride to Save the Arctic

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pixabay

By Lisa Wartenberg, MFA, RD, LD

Pears are sweet, bell-shaped fruits that have been enjoyed since ancient times. They can be eaten crisp or soft.

Read More Show Less
Photon-Photos / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The desert of Australia's Northern Territory has the iconic Ayers Rock, but not much else. Soon, it may be known as home to the world's largest solar farm, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 737-800 BCF (Boeing Converted Freighter) is marked "Prime Air" as part of Amazon Prime's freight aircraft during the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France on June 22. Mustafa Yalcin / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

It's Prime Day! The day when thousands of increasingly absurd items are discounted so deeply that you suddenly need items you never knew existed. Yes, I do need a hotdog shaped toaster next to me while I watch this Fast & Furious seven movie box set! And I need it in my house today!

Read More Show Less

By Peter Sinclair

The weather in many areas across the U.S. has been – and certainly throughout America's heartland was for much of the past winter and spring – frightful.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
There's a short window between when a tick bites and when it passes on bacteria or virus. MSU Ag Communications, Courtesy Dr. Tina Nations, CC BY-ND

By Jerome Goddard

When it comes to problems caused by ticks, Lyme disease hogs a lot of the limelight. But various tick species carry and transmit a collection of other pathogens, some of which cause serious, even fatal, conditions.

Read More Show Less
tomosang / Moment / Getty Images

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

Say goodbye to one of the dreamiest things about childhood. In the Midwest, fireflies are dying off.

Read More Show Less
A new Climate Emergency Fund contains more than $625,000 which will go to grassroots climate action groups like Extinction Rebellion and students who have organized weekly climate strikes all over the world. @ExtinctionR / Twitter

By Julia Conley

Heeding the call of grassroots campaigners, several wealthy philanthropists announced Friday a new fund that will raise money for climate action groups around the world.

Read More Show Less