Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Vertical Farms: The Future of Agriculture?

Food
Vertical Farms: The Future of Agriculture?

The PBS series The Good Stuff looked into eating bugs as part of their series on the "Future of Food." As part of that series, they also investigated vertical farming, which has gained much attention in the U.S., including the news that the world’s largest vertical farm recently broke ground in Newark, New Jersey.

The hosts of The Good Stuff head to Green Sense Farms in Indiana to witness firsthand how the indoor farm works and to see if it's really a feasible solution for growing the world's food.

"The world requires an area of farmland the size of South America to feed itself," says The Good Stuff. With the global population expected to reach a staggering 10 billion by 2056 and only so much arable land available, many are wondering how we will feed future generations.

And climate change is only confounding the problem.

"What we're seeing is a climate change issue that's severely affecting agriculture outdoors. We're seeing urbanization like crazy and we're seeing an increase in human population," Dickson Despommier, emeritus professor at Columbia University, says in the video. "You put those three things together and you've got another—I hate to use this cliché because everyone is using it now—but it's a perfect storm for disaster."

Despommier explains how he and one of his classes in 1999 came up with the idea, which eventually came to be known as vertical farming. Since then, the idea has been made into a reality (and a profitable one at that).

In this series, the hosts of The Good Stuff head to Green Sense Farms in Indiana to witness firsthand how the indoor farm works and to see if it's really a feasible solution for growing the world's food.

 

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

5 Ways Vertical Farms Are Changing the Way We Grow Food

Bill McKibben: The Turning Point Towards a Low-Carbon Future

12 Universities Leading the Charge in Serving Locally-Sourced Food

Lakota spiritual leader Chief Arvol Looking Horse attends a demonstration against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2015. Nicholas Kamm / AFP / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to cancel the controversial Keystone XL pipeline on the first day of his administration, a document reported by CBC on Sunday suggests.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A plume of smoke from wildfires burning in the Angeles National Forest is seen from downtown Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

California is bracing for rare January wildfires this week amid damaging Santa Ana winds coupled with unusually hot and dry winter weather.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A new study invites parents of cancer patients to answer questions about their environment. FatCamera / Getty Images

By Jennifer Sass, Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, Dr. Philip J. Landrigan and Simon Strong

"Prevention is the cure for child/teen cancer." This is the welcoming statement on a website called 'TheReasonsWhy.Us', where families affected by childhood cancers can sign up for a landmark new study into the potential environmental causes.

Read More Show Less
Madagascar has been experiencing ongoing droughts and food insecurity since 2016. arturbo / Getty Images

Nearly 1.6 million people in the southern part of Madagascar have faced food insecurity since 2016, experiencing one drought after another, the United Nations World Food Program reported.

Read More Show Less
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst stand at the Orion spacecraft during a visit at the training unit of the Columbus space laboratory at the European Astronaut training centre of the European Space Agency ESA in Cologne, Germany on May 18, 2016. Ina Fassbender / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Monir Ghaedi

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to keep most of Europe on pause, the EU aims for a breakthrough in its space program. The continent is seeking more than just a self-sufficient space industry competitive with China and the U.S.; the industry must also fit into the European Green Deal.

Read More Show Less