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Donatella Versace Says Fur Is Over: ‘It Doesn’t Feel Right’

Animals

Proving once again that kindness is what's truly attractive, Donatella Versace has made the compassionate decision to drop fur from her family label's collections.


In an interview with Vogue, the designer stated that she would no longer use real animal fur in any of her designs. "Fur? I'm out of that," she said. "I don't want to kill animals to make fashion. It doesn't feel right."

That's because it's not right, as PETA has been telling the designer since the 1990s, with runway disruptions, ads, action alerts to our supporters and meetings with the label. Versace has finally realized that it's unconscionable to cage, bludgeon, electrocute and skin animals—who are no different from her beloved dog, Audrey—for fur. PETA is sending Versace a box of fox-shaped vegan chocolates to thank her.

Versace was synonymous with animal skins for decades, so her decision marks a pivotal point in efforts to end the use of fur. She joins a long list of top designers in eschewing animal fur for luxe, cruelty-free faux materials, including Michael Kors, Gucci, Givenchy, BCBG and, just this week, Furla.

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