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Vegan Coffee Creamers for the Perfect Morning Cup

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When it comes to coffee and tea creamers, you may have to try a few before you find the perfect one for you. Some are creamier, some are sweeter, but there's something that all the best ones have in common: They don't harm cows by using their milk. Even if creamers tout a "dairy-free" label, you may find milk derivatives such as casein in the ingredients. Thankfully, there are so many delicious vegan creamers to choose from, and they're widely available in most grocery stores.


Here are some of our favorites:

Silk

With four soy and three almond flavors, there's something for everyone.

Ripple Foods Half & Half

Ripple Foods is tapping into the power of peas with vegan creamers that have less saturated fat and cholesterol than dairy creamers plus added omega-6s and omega-3s from plant sources. This is perfect for those who don't have a sweet tooth.

SO Delicious

Coconut milk flavors include French Vanilla, Hazelnut, Original, Barista Style French Vanilla and Barista Style Original. If you prefer almonds, the brand has you covered with Caramel, French Vanilla and Hazelnut varieties.

Laird Superfood

This health-conscious company (and PETA Business Friend) has thought of an ingenious way to start your day: with superfoods in your coffee. Its delicious vegan and gluten-free coffee creamers are packed with superfoods like coconut milk, Aquamin (calcium from marine algae), organic extra-virgin coconut oil, turmeric and others. Plus, the creamers don't need to be refrigerated, so you can take them with you on camping trips and other adventures.

Coconut Cloud

This brand's powdered creamer is sold in 6-ounce canisters and single-serving packets. The hazelnut and vanilla varieties are low in sugar and don't have the refined sugar often found in other flavored creamers.

Califia Farms

The brand's creamer is called Better Half, and that makes sense—this dairy-free option blends almond milk with coconut cream and is gluten-free, carrageenan-free and non-GMO.

nut pods

This brand uses coconut cream and almonds to create a perfect texture. It offers seasonal flavors like Pumpkin Spice and Vanilla Lemon, and you can choose Hazelnut, Original and French Vanilla year-round.

Trader Joe's

Choose between two kinds of delicious vegan coffee creamer: coconut-based or soy-based. Both are equally delicious.

Simple Truth Coconutmilk Creamer

The organic Kroger brand offers both canisters and single-serve packets of Vanilla or Original vegan creamer.

Wildwood Organic Soymilk Creamer

Wildwood Organic has been around for a while, and with a product that has a super-creamy texture and only 1 gram of sugar per serving, you can see why its recipe is tried and true. It's also easy to find in most grocery stores.

Walden Farms

This "accidentally vegan" creamer comes in Caramel, Original Cream, Sweet Cream, French Vanilla, Mocha and Hazelnut flavors.

ECOS Virgin Coconut Creamer

This vegan creamer's ingredients are pure and simple: coconut water, virgin coconut milk, unrefined coconut sugar, guar bean gum and xanthan gum. We love it!

Don't brew your own coffee at home? Almost all places that serve it offer soy, almond, coconut and other vegan milks, so don't be afraid to ask for them.

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