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America's 10 Most 'Sex-Happy' Cities Urged to Save Wildlife on Valentine's Day

Animals
All condom packages designed by Lori Lieber with artwork by Shawn DiCriscio. Photo credit:Center for Biological Diversity

The Center for Biological Diversity is sending America's 10 most sex-happy cities a Valentine's Day gift: 40,000 Endangered Species Condoms to help couples consider population growth's threat to wildlife before giving in to the holiday's romance.


Local volunteers in Austin, Texas and the other top-ranking cities identified by Men's Health Magazine will give away the condoms during events at zoos, museums and breweries. Volunteers will work to remind couples that safe sex saves wildlife.

"Lots of couples will get lucky this Valentine's Day, but wildlife and the environment will be far less fortunate in our increasingly crowded world," said Leigh Moyer, the Center for Biological Diversity's population organizer. "The habitat loss, resource depletion and climate change that come with rapid human population growth make it next to impossible for biodiversity to thrive. It's important to bring population growth back into the environmental conversation. Endangered Species Condoms make starting that conversation easier and they also make great Valentines."

The Valentine's Day condom distributions will take place in Arlington, Texas; Austin, Texas; Bakersfield, California.; Columbus, Ohio; Dallas; Denver; Durham, North Carolina.; Houston; Indianapolis; and Oklahoma City.

In the past 50 years, as human population has grown, wildlife populations have been halved. The United Nations predicts that the world's human population will reach 9.7 billion by 2050 and exceed 11 billion by 2100. The population of the U.S. is likely to reach 389 million in 2050, growing by more than 200 million people from 1950.

Scientists agree that we are currently in the midst of the planet's sixth mass wildlife extinction. While previous extinction periods were driven by geological or cosmic factors, the current crisis is caused by human activities.

Volunteers in Austin, Texas, the top city on the list, will hand out a total of 4,000 condoms for Valentine's Day at a number of events, from burlesque shows and breweries to art exhibits and flea markets. One thousand Endangered Species Condoms will be distributed at the largest event, the Mexic-Arte Museum's Mix 'n' Mash: XOXO party on Friday, Feb. 10 from 5 to 9 p.m.

"Species we know and love here in Austin—from the horned lizard to the monarch butterfly—are threatened by our ballooning population," said Jessica Herrera, the organization's population and sustainability media specialist, who will be handing out condoms at the Mexic-Arte museum. "While it's pretty cool that Austin is such a 'sex-happy' city, it's not cool that overcrowding could be putting critters at risk. That's why I'm handing out condoms this Valentine's Day."

The Endangered Species Condoms are wrapped in colorful packages featuring six different endangered species and information about the impact of runaway human population growth on polar bears, monarch butterflies and other imperiled wildlife. The Center for Biological Diversity has given away 700,000 free Endangered Species Condoms since 2009.

The population and sustainability program uses creative media to promote a range of common-sense solutions like access to family planning and reproductive health services, as well as education, opportunity and equal rights for women and girls.

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