Quantcast

Russia Approves World's First Coronavirus Vaccine After Less Than Two Months of Testing

Health + Wellness
President Vladimir Putin is seen enjoying the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Russia's Health Ministry has given regulatory approval for the world's first COVID-19 vaccine after less than two months of human testing, President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.


"This morning, for the first time in the world, a vaccine against the new coronavirus was registered" in Russia, Putin said during a televised video conference call with government ministers.

Putin added that the vaccine, developed by Moscow's Gamaleya Institute, has proven efficient during tests and promises to offer "sustainable immunity" against the coronavirus.

"I would like to repeat that it has passed all the necessary tests," Putin said. "The most important thing is to ensure full safety of using the vaccine and its efficiency."

Putin's Daughter Among Vaccinated

The Russian leader also said that one of his daughters has already been inoculated and is feeling well.

"One of my daughters got vaccinated, so in this sense, she took part in the testing," Putin said.

After the first vaccine shot, his daughter experienced a slight fever, 38 degrees Celsius (100.4°F). Her temperature came down to just slightly above normal the next day.

"After the second shot, she had a slight fever again, and then everything was fine. She is feeling well and has a high antibody count," Putin said.

He didn't specify which of his two daughters, Maria or Katerina, received the vaccine.

Russian health authorities have said that medical workers, teachers and other risk groups will be the first to receive shots of the vaccine.

Years of Work Reduced to Weeks

Russia is the first country to register a COVID-19 vaccine. As countries worldwide race to produce the first vaccine, health experts warn that speed and national pride could compromise safety.

Scientists in Russia and abroad have questioned Moscow's decision to register the vaccine before Phase 3 trials that normally last for months and involve thousands of people, but Putin emphasized that the vaccine underwent the necessary trials and that vaccination will be voluntary.

Russian officials have said that large-scale production of the vaccine will begin in September, and mass vaccination may start as early as October.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, meanwhile, has lauded Russia's efforts in developing the vaccine and said that the Philippines is ready to work with Moscow on vaccine trials, supply and production. Duterte volunteered to "be the first they can experiment on."

"I will tell President Putin that I have huge trust in your studies in combating COVID and I believe that the vaccine that you have produced is really good for humanity," Duterte said, adding that he thinks Russia's vaccine will be ready for the Philippines by December.

Reposted with permission from Deutsche Welle.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
EcoWatch joins Fabien Cousteau to remove marine debris in the Florida Keys and talk about the future of the oceans. Tiffany Duong / Ocean Rebels

Much of what we've been able to learn about the underwater world has built on the legacy of underwater explorer and pioneer Jacques Yves Cousteau. In 1943, Cousteau invented the aqua-lung, which completed his self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). This technology forever changed how humans interact with the blue world and remains the precursor of modern-day scuba diving equipment.

Read More Show Less
A humpback whale, one of the species affected by the Pacific marine heat wave, breaches in Kenai Fjords National Park in the Gulf of Alaska. Kaitlin Thoreson / National Park Service

By Hannah Thomasy

From 2014 to 2016, the Gulf of Alaska experienced the worst marine heat wave of the decade. From single-celled organisms to top predators, practically no level of the ecosystem was left unscathed. During the Pacific marine heat wave, tens of thousands of dead seabirds washed up on beaches, unusually low numbers of humpback whales arrived in their summer habitats, and toxic algal blooms spread along the West Coast of North America.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Fire in one part of a community can contaminate the water system used by other residents, as Santa Rosa, California, discovered after the Tubbs Fire. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

By Andrew J. Whelton

More than 58,000 fires scorched the United States last year, and 2021 is on track to be even drier. What many people don't realize is that these wildfires can do lasting damage beyond the reach of the flames – they can contaminate entire drinking water systems with carcinogens that last for months after the blaze. That water flows to homes, contaminating the plumbing, too.

Over the past four years, wildfires have contaminated drinking water distribution networks and building plumbing for more than 240,000 people.

Read More Show Less
The new greenhouse will accelerate Lufa's mission to grow food. Lufa

By Sean Fleming

  • The world's largest rooftop greenhouse is in Montreal, Canada.
  • It measures more than 15,000m2 and produces more than 11,000kg of food per week.
  • The company behind it had to hire 200 new employees due to pandemic-driven demand.

Can you grow enough produce for an entire city in rooftop greenhouses? Two entrepreneurs in Montreal, Canada, believe it might be possible.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Environmental activists carry a large snake pipeline as they protest against the Enbridge Line 3 oil pipeline on May 7, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

From fake oil spills in Washington, D.C. and New York City to a "people mural" in Seattle spelling out "Defund Line 3," climate and Indigenous protesters in 50 U.S. cities and across seven other countries spanning four continents took to the streets on Friday for a day of action pushing 20 banks to ditch the controversial tar sands pipeline.

Read More Show Less