Quantcast

Urine Samples Show How Eating Organic Can Dramatically Reduce Pesticides in Your Body

Food

Research from the IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute has shown that switching from a conventional diet to an organic one can drastically reduce the presence of pesticides in your body. This video from the institute shows what happens when a family switches to an all-organic diet for two weeks:

But new research published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives shows that just eating organic might not be enough to keep pesticides out of our bodies.

Civil Eats reported:

Researchers fed 40 Mexican-American children in Salinas (a rural agricultural area) and in Oakland, California a diet of conventional fruits and vegetables for four days. Then they fed the kids (between the ages of three and six and 20 in each group) a week-long diet of organic produce before returning them to a conventional diet for the last five days. The researchers tested the children’s urine daily for the presence of insecticides and herbicides.

Overall, the results showed that the presence of two kinds of pesticides (organophosphate insecticides and the herbicide 2,4-D) in the children’s bodies decreased after eating organic produce (by 40 and 49 percent in the insecticides and by 25 percent in the herbicide).

But researchers didn’t detect any decrease in the levels of other pesticides (such as pyrethroid insecticides like home bug sprays).

“That could mean that the diet wasn’t an important source of exposure for those pesticides,” said Asa Bradman, a researcher at Berkeley’s Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health who led the study. In other words, even if you eliminate pesticides entirely from your diet, you may still be at risk of exposure to them if you live close to farm fields that spray pesticides or go in buildings or homes that use insecticides.

That's why groups like Pesticide Action Network are working to pass legislation to better report and regulate pesticide drift. Only California requires farmers to report pesticide use, said Civil Eats. And, according to Beyond Pesticides, 43 states even have laws that preempt local authorities from regulating pesticides.

43 states preempt local authority from regulating pesticides. Photo credit: Pesticide Action Network

“We can change the agricultural system so that it’s no longer dependent on pesticides,” said Emily Marquez, a scientist at Pesticide Action Network. “One way to do this would be to subsidize farmers to help them convert their land—by improving biodiversity and creating a conservation wetland, for example. That will help them begin to transition away from pesticides.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

85% of Tampons Contain Monsanto’s ‘Cancer Causing’ Glyphosate

12 Nontoxic Nail Polish Brands

Elon Musk’s Brother Wants to Revolutionize Our Food System

CBS Reporter Ben Swann Tells the Truth About CDC Vaccine Cover-Up

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less

By Joe Vukovich

Under the guise of responding to consumer complaints that today's energy- and water-efficient dishwashers take too long, the Department of Energy has proposed creating a new class of dishwashers that wouldn't be subject to any water or energy efficiency standards at all. The move would not only undermine three decades of progress for consumers and the environment, it is based on serious distortions of fact regarding today's dishwashers.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Emily Moran

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you've noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, "masting."

Read More Show Less

By Catherine Davidson

Tashi Yudon peeks out from behind a net curtain at the rooftops below and lets out a sigh, her breath frosting on the windowpane in front of her.

Some 700 kilometers away in the capital city Delhi, temperatures have yet to dip below 25 degrees Celsius, but in Spiti there is already an atmosphere of impatient expectation as winter settles over the valley.

Read More Show Less

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington is looking to recruit 10,000 dogs to study for the next 10 years to see if they can improve the life expectancy of man's best friend and their quality of life, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less