Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

This Montreal Company Turns Juice Pulp Into Food

Popular
Stillgood Inc.

By Harriette Halepis

More food isn't the answer to a growing population problem. Sustainably upcycling food is, and there's one Montreal man who knows how to make that happen.

Jonathan Rodrigue is the former business development director of Moisson Montreal, the largest food bank in Canada. His job at Moisson was to take as much edible waste as he could find and distribute it to various food banks throughout the city.


That upcycled juice pulp looks good enough to eat!

Stillgood Inc.

Rodrigue developed a program at Moisson that collected edible waste from more than 200 of the province's grocery stores to feed people in need. You could say that he has seen his fair share of food waste (two tonnes per store monthly). "I saw the scope of food waste at many levels," said Rodrigue.

He is talking about not only the food wasted in grocery stores and other markets but also the massive amount of food wasted during production. It's not uncommon for edible food to wind up in trash bins or on warehouse floors, mostly due to poor planning. Having this bird's-eye view gave Rodrigue a different perspective.

Stillgood Inc.

He saw many different types of products that were not being collected, distributed or upcycled. He and his team looked for basic ingredients that could be turned into other goods.

This led him to create Stillgood Inc., a company that upcycles juice pulp and spent grains by turning them into tasty bars, snacks, cookies and other treats. Rodrigue chose to focus on pulp and grains because he was looking for a way to upcycle items that were not yet being used.

"Non-profits usually choose products like bread and bakery goods that are already manufactured and ready to be eaten, but those aren't basic ingredients," he said. "They're already produced." Stillgood is still on the hunt for raw ingredients that may be the perfect addition to the company's products to decide what's needed to create a new product.

Rodrigue's passion for upcycling is evident, and he puts great emphasis on the fact that Stillgood isn't just a passing trend or fad. "For me, upcycling and reducing waste are a way of being," he said. "I didn't wake up one day and decide to cash in on a trend. My background is in food waste reduction."

While Stillgood is gaining traction in Montreal, that's not Rodrigue's end goal. "For me, building a company that reduces food waste is a way to try to change the way that food manufacturing is done right now."

Rodrigue wants other companies to see Stillgood as a sustainable model for food waste reduction. "We want people to look at what we're doing and say 'Hey, it's actually possible to reduce food waste and here's how,'" he said.

Stillgood products can be found in various stores in the Montreal area and through the city's rooftop farming initiative, Lufa Farms. Rodrigue has plans to expand the company's product line in the near future and is currently working on developing vegan snack options.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A sand tiger shark swims over the USS Tarpon in Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. Tane Casserley / NOAA

By John R. Platt

Here at The Revelator, we love a good shark story.

The problem is, there aren't all that many good shark stories. According to recent research, sharks and their relatives represent one of the world's most imperiled groups of species. Of the more than 1,250 known species of sharks, skates, rays and chimeras — collectively known as chondrichthyan fishes — at least a quarter are threatened with extinction.

Read More Show Less
The Anderson Community Group. Left to right, Caroline Laur, Anita Foust, the Rev. Bryon Shoffner, and Bill Compton, came together to fight for environmental justice in their community. Anderson Community Group

By Isabella Garcia

On Thanksgiving Day 2019, right after Caroline Laur had finished giving thanks for her home, a neighbor at church told her that a company had submitted permit requests to build an asphalt plant in their community. The plans indicated the plant would be 250 feet from Laur's backdoor.

Read More Show Less
Berber woman cooks traditional flatbread using an earthen oven in her mud-walled village home located near the historic village of Ait Benhaddou in Morocco, Africa on Jan. 4, 2016. Creative Touch Imaging Ltd. /NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Danielle Nierenberg and Jason Flatt

The world's Indigenous Peoples face severe and disproportionate rates of food insecurity. While Indigenous Peoples comprise 5 percent of the world's population, they account for 15 percent of the world's poor, according to the World Health Organization.

Read More Show Less
Danny Choo / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Olivia Sullivan

One of the many unfortunate outcomes of the coronavirus pandemic has been the quick and obvious increase in single-use plastic products. After COVID-19 arrived in the United States, many grocery stores prohibited customers from using reusable bags, coffee shops banned reusable mugs, and takeout food with plastic forks and knives became the new normal.

Read More Show Less
A mostly empty 110 freeway toward downtown Los Angeles, California on April 28, 2020. Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The shelter in place orders that brought clean skies to some of the world's most polluted cities and saw greenhouse gas emissions plummet were just a temporary relief that provided an illusory benefit to the long-term consequences of the climate crisis. According to new research, the COVID-19 lockdowns will have a "neglible" impact on global warming, as Newshub in New Zealand reported.

Read More Show Less
Centrosaurus apertus was a plant-eating, single-horned dinosaur that lived 76 to 77 million years ago. Sergey Krasovskiy / Stocktrek Images / Getty Images

Scientists have discovered and diagnosed the first instance of malignant cancer in a dinosaur, and they did so by using modern medical techniques. They published their results earlier this week in The Lancet Oncology.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Parks keep people happy in times of global crisis, economic shutdown and public anger. NPS

By Joe Roman and Taylor Ricketts

The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States is the deepest and longest period of malaise in a dozen years. Our colleagues at the University of Vermont have concluded this by analyzing posts on Twitter. The Vermont Complex Systems Center studies 50 million tweets a day, scoring the "happiness" of people's words to monitor the national mood. That mood today is at its lowest point since 2008 when they started this project.

Read More Show Less