Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Will Trump's Climate Denial Impact Outcome of Huge UN Ocean Conference Next Week?

Popular
Will Trump's Climate Denial Impact Outcome of Huge UN Ocean Conference Next Week?
Coral bleaching. Wikimedia Commons

From severe coral bleaching to rising sea levels, climate change is drastically impacting the health of our oceans. However, these facts seem to evade the President of the United States.

The Trump administration's notorious skepticism of global warming is affecting plans for the upcoming United Nations ocean conference, according to Sweden's deputy prime minister, Isabella Lovin.


"I think I can safely say that the United States has not been very keen on strong language on climate change," Lovin told Reuters.

"We are not prepared to leave that (strong language) out. That's really fundamental," she added about the draft documents. "The impacts of climate change are almost immeasurable."

Leaders from 200 countries will meet at the conference in New York next week to devise ways to reverse the decline in oceanic health. The United Nations has identified global warming, overfishing and pollution as major threats to our oceans. Lovin as well as Fiji Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama will co-host the weeklong event.

"The decline of the oceans is really a threat to the entire planet ... We need to start working together," Lovin said.

Additionally, Lovin described how engaging with Washington about the ocean conference has been difficult, partly because key positions at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have not yet been filled.

America has taken a drastic fall as an international climate leader ever since last year's election. Trump, who believes that global warming is a hoax and has been dismantling regulations that protect the environment since taking office in January, will announce next week if the U.S. will withdraw from the landmark Paris climate agreement.

Lovin, who is also Sweden's climate minister, has taken a dig at Trump and his climate denial before. In February, she posted a photograph on Twitter of her signing a bill that requires Sweden to phase out greenhouse gas emissions by 2045, one of the most ambitious plans by any developed country.

The photo featured an all-female staff—a stark contrast to a photo of Trump signing an executive order restricting access to abortion while surround by men.

"You can interpret it as you want," Lovin's spokesperson told BuzzFeed News. "It's more that Sweden is a feminist government and this is a very important law that we just decided on ... And to make the Paris agreement happen we need climate leadership."

One of the beavers released into England's Somerset county this January, which has now helped build the area's first dam in more than 400 years. Ben Birchall / PA Images via Getty Images

England's Somerset county can now boast its first beaver dam in more than 400 years.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Australia's dingo fences, built to protect livestock from wild dogs, stretch for thousands of miles. Marian Deschain / Wikimedia

By Alex McInturff, Christine Wilkinson and Wenjing Xu

What is the most common form of human infrastructure in the world? It may well be the fence. Recent estimates suggest that the total length of all fencing around the globe is 10 times greater than the total length of roads. If our planet's fences were stretched end to end, they would likely bridge the distance from Earth to the Sun multiple times.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Hopi blue corn is being affected by climate change. Abrahami / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

Climate change is making ancient Hopi farming nearly impossible, threatening not just the Tribe's staple food source, but a pillar of its culture and religion, the Arizona Republic reports.

Read More Show Less
Pollution on the Ganges River. Kaushik Ghosh / Moment Open / Getty Images

The most polluted river in the world continues to be exploited through fishing practices that threaten endangered wildlife, new research shows.

Read More Show Less
Oil spills, such as the one in Mauritius in August 2020, could soon be among the ecological crimes considered ecocide. - / AFP / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

An expert panel of top international and environmental lawyers have begun working this month on a legal definition of "ecocide" with the goal of making mass ecological damage an enforceable international crime on par with war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

Read More Show Less