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The holiday season is upon us and with it, a deluge of new tech, trinkets, and advertisements convincing us to indulge. But of course this torrent of consumption is nothing new, especially in the free-market capitalist consumerist nation of the United States. Every year, the holiday shopping season, spanning across November and December, sees massive monthly profits for corporations, employees crushed by inhuman workloads, and environmental destruction. And every year, the connections from consumerism to capitalism to the climate crisis are once again laid bare. Today we dive into the holidays and the manufactured desire for more to understand how capitalism is driving the climate crisis. But it’s not enough to just critique, we will also try to understand what will dismantle our current system and develop an ecologically sound and ethical world in its stead.

Underneath the bright glitz of Christmas lights and shrouded under the cover of wrapped presents, lies the stark reality of the holidays in the imperial core. Starting with the celebration of colonial genocide in Thanksgiving, followed immediately by the capitalist schemes of Black Friday and Cyber Monday that bleed into a month of Christmas celebrations foregrounding extensive gift-giving ceremonies, holidays have been co-opted by corporations and the relentless drive for profit and growth. Gift giving has been present in the ethos of winter holidays for hundreds of years, a tradition which some scholars point towards 19th century New York City aristocrats for starting as a way of shifting December holidays from a season when “poorer people could demand food and drink from the wealthy and celebrate in the streets'' to one of cozy celebration in the home encouraging gift giving to children. But the amount of gifts were generally small in the 1800s, and it wasn’t until the rise of advertising around the turn of the 20th century, that retailers, especially toy retailers, saw the potential of the holidays for profit and capital accumulation. By the 2000s, US retail sales during the holiday season reached $416.4 billion and have only gotten bigger. Of the many factors driving the US shopper to spend an average of $1000 on presents every year, advertising is definitely making a mark. Advertisements make us feel good about something we know, deep down, is either unethical, useless, harmful, or all three. They are the rose tinted glasses that make the things in our home seem necessary when they are actually not. So, for a moment, let’s pull off those rose tinted glasses and understand the impact of the capitalist model on ourselves, our planet, and our holidays.

The holiday season is upon us and with it, a deluge of new tech, trinkets, and advertisements convincing us to indulge. But of course this torrent of consumption is nothing new, especially in the free-market capitalist consumerist nation of the United States. Every year, the holiday shopping season, spanning across November and December, sees massive monthly profits for corporations, employees crushed by inhuman workloads, and environmental destruction. And every year, the connections from consumerism to capitalism to the climate crisis are once again laid bare. Today we dive into the holidays and the manufactured desire for more to understand how capitalism is driving the climate crisis. But it’s not enough to just critique, we will also try to understand what will dismantle our current system and develop an ecologically sound and ethical world in its stead.


Underneath the bright glitz of Christmas lights and shrouded under the cover of wrapped presents, lies the stark reality of the holidays in the imperial core. Starting with the celebration of colonial genocide in Thanksgiving, followed immediately by the capitalist schemes of Black Friday and Cyber Monday that bleed into a month of Christmas celebrations foregrounding extensive gift-giving ceremonies, holidays have been co-opted by corporations and the relentless drive for profit and growth. Gift giving has been present in the ethos of winter holidays for hundreds of years, a tradition which some scholars point towards 19th century New York City aristocrats for starting as a way of shifting December holidays from a season when “poorer people could demand food and drink from the wealthy and celebrate in the streets” to one of cozy celebration in the home encouraging gift giving to children. But the amount of gifts were generally small in the 1800s, and it wasn’t until the rise of advertising around the turn of the 20th century, that retailers, especially toy retailers, saw the potential of the holidays for profit and capital accumulation. By the 2000s, US retail sales during the holiday season reached $416.4 billion and have only gotten bigger. Of the many factors driving the US shopper to spend an average of $1000 on presents every year, advertising is definitely making a mark. Advertisements make us feel good about something we know, deep down, is either unethical, useless, harmful, or all three. They are the rose tinted glasses that make the things in our home seem necessary when they are actually not. So, for a moment, let’s pull off those rose tinted glasses and understand the impact of the capitalist model on ourselves, our planet, and our holidays.

To learn more about the environmental impacts of the holidays, check out the video above!

Our Changing Climate is an environmental YouTube channel that explores the intersections of social, political, climatic, and food-based issues. The channel dives into topics like zero waste and nuclear energy in order to understand how to effectively tackle climate change and environmental destruction.

To receive all the latest videos produced by Charlie subscribe to his YouTube channel here.

Read More
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In the 1970s, environmentalists and politicians in the imperial core quivered in their seats over the prospect of a population explosion. Malthusian prophecies of total collapse and Thanos-esque proposals of racial extermination pervaded political thought. For many, it seemed the end of the world was at our doorstep, and one of the main worries was that food production wouldn't be able to support the billions of mouths that would be born in the coming decades. But then the green revolution happened, and everything was supposedly better. Labor-saving technology and fossil fuel-laden chemicals pulled the world back from the precipice of famine and death. At least, that's the dominant narrative that has been pushed since the 1970s. Today, though, we're going to deconstruct this story about industrial farming, and answer the question: can small-scale regenerative farming feed the world?

The so-called Green Revolution was a temporary patch on a much larger food system crisis. If anything, the industrial farming explosion in the 1970s, which implemented new labor-saving technologies like combine harvesters, high-yield seed varieties, and consolidation of farmland to increase global food production, seems to have done more harm than good. Part of this has to do with the fact that the Green Revolution substituted the cost of labor with that of fossil fuels. Instead of endless hours on the farm, landholders just used fossil fuels to power their harvesters, tillers, and develop synthetic fertilizers. For an aging farming population, this was great news. You could get the same yields you were getting before, and only have to work two weeks in the spring and two in the fall. For the soil, the atmosphere, and the insect and bird populations, however, this new industrial agriculture spelled disaster.

In the 1970s, environmentalists and politicians in the imperial core quivered in their seats over the prospect of a population explosion. Malthusian prophecies of total collapse and Thanos-esque proposals of racial extermination pervaded political thought. For many, it seemed the end of the world was at our doorstep, and one of the main worries was that food production wouldn’t be able to support the billions of mouths that would be born in the coming decades. But then the green revolution happened, and everything was supposedly better. Labor-saving technology and fossil fuel-laden chemicals pulled the world back from the precipice of famine and death. At least, that’s the dominant narrative that has been pushed since the 1970s. Today, though, we’re going to deconstruct this story about industrial farming, and answer the question: can small-scale regenerative farming feed the world?


The so-called Green Revolution was a temporary patch on a much larger food system crisis. If anything, the industrial farming explosion in the 1970s, which implemented new labor-saving technologies like combine harvesters, high-yield seed varieties, and consolidation of farmland to increase global food production, seems to have done more harm than good. Part of this has to do with the fact that the Green Revolution substituted the cost of labor with that of fossil fuels. Instead of endless hours on the farm, landholders just used fossil fuels to power their harvesters, tillers, and develop synthetic fertilizers. For an aging farming population, this was great news. You could get the same yields you were getting before, and only have to work two weeks in the spring and two in the fall. For the soil, the atmosphere, and the insect and bird populations, however, this new industrial agriculture spelled disaster.

To learn more about the environmental impacts of industrial farming and why small-scale agriculture might be a viable and sustainable alternative, check out the video above!

Our Changing Climate is an environmental YouTube channel that explores the intersections of social, political, climatic, and food-based issues. The channel dives into topics like zero waste and nuclear energy in order to understand how to effectively tackle climate change and environmental destruction.

To receive all the latest videos produced by Charlie subscribe to his YouTube channel here.

Read More

When we look out into the murky depths of our future, it's hard not to despair. The scars of capitalism run ragged through our minds, bodies, and environments. The uncertainty of a world in climate chaos is driving many into a state of apathy. Inaction and status quo politicking is so prevalent among the ruling class that it's easy to believe in neoliberal hawk Margaret Thatcher's assertion that "there is no alternative." Well, there is. It's beautiful, vibrant, and gives me hope for a juster, more ethical, and more ecological future. It's called Solarpunk. Today, we're going to dive into the visions of Solarpunk, uncovering what it is, what it looks like, and how exactly it can be implemented right now to construct a radical eco and human-centric present.

Solarpunk. A burgeoning movement blending aesthetics and politics that envisions a future which answers the question: "What kind of world will emerge when we finally transition to renewables?" In opposition to the environments of cyberpunk or dieselpunk, which craft dystopian futures based in capitalist corruption, technological authoritarianism, and the deification of fossil fuels, Solarpunk grounds the future in the task of bridging the chasm between human society and the natural world. A chasm that is currently widening at the hands of exploitative capitalism. So, Solarpunk runs starkly in opposition to the political and economic forces of late-stage capitalism by demanding a non-hierarchical, diverse, decentralized yet integrated world. A world with worker co-operatives, tool shares, and common-pool resources. And all these decentralized approaches to economies would emphasize production focused not only on ecological well-being but human well-being. Solarpunk also means embracing technologies like rooftop solar, passive houses, or even modern sailing innovations to allow the natural workings of the planet to flourish while also providing a comfortable living to the masses. In short, Solarpunk argues that just climate action doesn't have to mean living in scarcity or giving things up, it instead shows us how beautiful the world could be when we live with appropriate abundance.

When we look out into the murky depths of our future, it’s hard not to despair. The scars of capitalism run ragged through our minds, bodies, and environments. The uncertainty of a world in climate chaos is driving many into a state of apathy. Inaction and status quo politicking is so prevalent among the ruling class that it’s easy to believe in neoliberal hawk Margaret Thatcher’s assertion that “there is no alternative.” Well, there is. It’s beautiful, vibrant, and gives me hope for a juster, more ethical, and more ecological future. It’s called Solarpunk. Today, we’re going to dive into the visions of Solarpunk, uncovering what it is, what it looks like, and how exactly it can be implemented right now to construct a radical eco and human-centric present.


Solarpunk. A burgeoning movement blending aesthetics and politics that envisions a future which answers the question: “What kind of world will emerge when we finally transition to renewables?” In opposition to the environments of cyberpunk or dieselpunk, which craft dystopian futures based in capitalist corruption, technological authoritarianism, and the deification of fossil fuels, Solarpunk grounds the future in the task of bridging the chasm between human society and the natural world. A chasm that is currently widening at the hands of exploitative capitalism. So, Solarpunk runs starkly in opposition to the political and economic forces of late-stage capitalism by demanding a non-hierarchical, diverse, decentralized yet integrated world. A world with worker co-operatives, tool shares, and common-pool resources. And all these decentralized approaches to economies would emphasize production focused not only on ecological well-being but human well-being. Solarpunk also means embracing technologies like rooftop solar, passive houses, or even modern sailing innovations to allow the natural workings of the planet to flourish while also providing a comfortable living to the masses. In short, Solarpunk argues that just climate action doesn’t have to mean living in scarcity or giving things up, it instead shows us how beautiful the world could be when we live with appropriate abundance.

To learn even more about Solarpunk and see its beautiful visuals, check out the video above!

Our Changing Climate is an environmental YouTube channel that explores the intersections of social, political, climatic, and food-based issues. The channel dives into topics like zero waste and nuclear energy in order to understand how to effectively tackle climate change and environmental destruction.

To receive all the latest videos produced by Charlie subscribe to his YouTube channel here.

Read More
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