EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life. 
Mentioned by:

The climate needs your help, the water needs your help, the land needs your help. In 2019 be part of the solution. The soil you walk on and grow food in holds a secret to some of the biggest problems facing the planet today.

Here are just some of the ways you can be part of the solution to regenerate the planet in 2019 and beyond, starting with soil:

The climate needs your help, the water needs your help, the land needs your help. In 2019 be part of the solution. The soil you walk on and grow food in holds a secret to some of the biggest problems facing the planet today.


Here are just some of the ways you can be part of the solution to regenerate the planet in 2019 and beyond, starting with soil:

1. Watch and share our new video.

Learn how to make 2019 the year you got involved in the movement to regenerate the planet. Watch the video below:

[facebook https://www.facebook.com/kissthegroundCA/videos/2294807857423260/ expand=1]

2. Compost at home.

Because food waste is food for the soil that grows your food! Learn more about how cool composting is via The Compost Story.

3. Grow your own food.

Learn how to create your own regenerative garden in your backyard. Check out the post below:

4. Become a Soil Advocate!

The next Kiss the Ground Soil Advocate Training begins on Jan. 15. Learn how to powerfully present the topics of soil health and regenerative agriculture as solutions to climate change, water scarcity and feeding the world.

5. Support a Farmer to be Trained in Regenerative Agriculture!

Our Farmland Program provides scholarships for producers to attend trainings and provides the technical support needed for them to successfully transition to soil focused regenerative agricultural management practices. For $5,500 you can fund the transition of a farm to one that regenerates land. This includes training, travel costs, consulting time, and soil testing. Learn more about our new Fund a Farmer Program.

6. Become a Kiss the Ground Member.

By becoming a member, your monthly donations make it possible for us to educate youth, consumers, and businesses, create media, train farmers, and advocate for healthy soils across the globe. In addition, members are granted access to resources and monthly member “Living Regeneratively” webinars designed to provide you with tools to help you explore regeneration in your own life, decolonize your mind, connect to nature, and become a steward of the planet. Learn more.

Read More
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Planting a garden has the power to change the world. Regenerative gardens can help reverse global warming by restoring soil health. We're bringing victory gardens back. This time, it's for the climate.

Our friends Ron Finley and Rosario Dawson explain how you can make your home garden regenerative in this new video premiere from Kiss The Ground and Green America.

Planting a garden has the power to change the world. Regenerative gardens can help reverse global warming by restoring soil health. We’re bringing victory gardens back. This time, it’s for the climate.


Our friends Ron Finley and Rosario Dawson explain how you can make your home garden regenerative in this new video premiere from Kiss The Ground and Green America.

What is a Climate Victory Garden and Why Is It Important?

“Climate Victory Gardens” were inspired by the “Victory Gardens” planted during the first and second World Wars. By 1944, nearly 20 million victory gardens produced eight million tons of food, equaling over 40 percent of the fresh fruits and vegetables consumed in the U.S. at the time. These victory gardens fed Americans at home, to make more farm-raised food available for the troops abroad.

We are once again in the position where we, as everyday citizens, have the opportunity to use our gardens as a force for change. Instead of gardening in support of war efforts, we are gardening to fight global warming.

Even your small home garden can utilize regenerative farming practices like keeping the soil covered, not tilling, encouraging biodiversity, using compost, avoiding the use of chemicals and creating fertility onsite.

“We have communities nationwide that are food prisons that could be producing their own organic food while addressing climate change. By educating the public about regeneratively homegrown food, Climate Victory Gardens are raising awareness about one of the biggest global challenges of our time and showing Americans how they can make a difference for themselves, their households, and their communities. Soil Equals Life.”

— Ron Finley of The Ron Finley Project

A very special thanks to Green America, Rosario Dawson, Ron Finley and the Ron Finley Project, our amazing film crew and to Kellogg Garden Products for their support in bringing this video to life—and thank YOU in advance for helping us share this video and supporting the regeneration of our planet, one garden at a time.

Read More

One of the biggest things we can do to revolutionize regenerative farming is to focus on perennials!

A plant being perennial means it lives for multiple years and can be harvested each year. Compare this to a plant that seeds and dies every year, and needs to replanted and retilled each year. Perennials are able to grow much longer roots that can feed more of the soil biology, and as a result of their longer life create less soil disturbance and compaction.

One of the biggest things we can do to revolutionize regenerative farming is to focus on perennials!


A plant being perennial means it lives for multiple years and can be harvested each year. Compare this to a plant that seeds and dies every year, and needs to replanted and retilled each year. Perennials are able to grow much longer roots that can feed more of the soil biology, and as a result of their longer life create less soil disturbance and compaction.

This doesn’t mean we should only plant perennials though. The solution is polyculture! This means we need to plant different crops in the same space; both annuals and perennials! Annuals are not bad, but monocultured ecosystems destroy diversity, especially when they are all annual plants that disappear entirely every year. When we use polyculture we emulate nature, and that’s always a good thing. The more biodiversity the better!

Read More
Spinning icon while loading more posts.