Quantcast
EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
www.facebook.com

In this beautiful video from The Dodo, scuba divers rescue whale sharks stuck in a fishing net. The best part comes next—when the divers' newfound friends hang around to celebrate.

The extraordinary whale shark takes 30 years to reach maturity and can live more than 100 years. They can grow more than 40 feet long. They can even stand on their tails.

And while they are the largest fish in the sea, they are not predators, but rather filter feeders subsisting on the tiniest food available—zooplankton and small fish such as sardines and anchovies swimming into their open mouths.

Their size and thick skin help protect them from predators, but not from humans, as commercial fishing has exploited them to the brink of extinction.

This amazing footage was shared by Txus R. at Indocruises.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
www.youtube.com

Check out this video from Great Big Story to see how scientists are solving crimes against animals.

Wildlife, including endangered species, are killed illegally, smuggled and sold for billions of dollars each year.

Founded by a crime scene investigator, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon, uses state-of-the-art technology (as well as flesh-eating beetles). Meet some of the forensics experts at "the only full service crime lab for wildlife in the world."

Elmar Gubisch / EyeEm / Getty Images

Installing solar panels is a great option for homeowners who want to reduce their power bills, and the payback period can be just a handful of years with favorable conditions. However, renters and apartment owners cannot use a typical solar power system due to the lack of space, and renters in particular must also negotiate with their landlords. A miniature solar system that is portable and easy to install can be a better option in these cases.

Rooftop solar systems can greatly reduce your electric bills, and you can add solar batteries to store solar energy for use at night. However, because most systems are tied to the power local grid, you must meet many technical requirements and get a permit to put solar on your property. The initial investment and paperwork are not a problem when installing solar panels in a home you own, but they're a limiting factor for renters.

If you don't own your home or apartment, you may have little incentive to invest in improving someone else's property. Even if your landlord gives you permission to install solar panels, the decision only makes sense financially if you plan to rent for a very long time — longer than the solar payback period. Also, consider the following factors:

  • When your lease ends, your landlord may not be willing to purchase the solar panels you installed.
  • Moving rooftop solar panels to another home is difficult, and you will need a professional installation and another permit for the new property.

There are many types of miniature solar systems that can be installed without the complex requirements and permitting procedures of more permanent structures. These systems are an excellent option for renters, since taking them to another property is as simple as relocating your TV.

Read More Show Less
www.youtube.com

In this video from BBC Earth, flying fish make spectacular escapes from their underwater predators, the Dorado fish. Leaping and sailing hundreds of yards above the water is an impressive act—and one very much appreciated by the frigate birds looking on.

Watch the incredible video above.

Trending
www.youtube.com

Car collisions with deer, elk and moose happen about a million times a year, but what if animals had their own crossings to move around safely?

In Banff National Park, the strategic placement of wildlife overpasses and underpasses has proven to be immensely successful. If implemented widely, such a system could reduce the extreme costs in animal lives and billions of dollars to humans.

And as climate change forces animals to migrate, their need to cross roads will only increase.

Watch this video from Vox to see how this problem—and the cost of addressing it—can be solved today.

www.youtube.com

Marine life rely on sound to navigate, socialize, and find food and mates, but it's becoming increasingly difficult for them to hear each other. Noise caused by human activity is now an inescapable threat to their lives.

In the video above from Vox, we hear some of the amazing sounds that underwater creatures make, and learn how they're impacted by noise pollution.

From leisure boats to industrial seismic blasting, humans have created an extreme situation. It's hard not to compare it to sound torture, now banned for being cruel and unusual punishment!

If we wouldn't inflict such pain on our worst enemies, then why are we so ruthless to our neighbors in the sea?

Be sure to watch the video to the end to get to the good news!

www.youtube.com

In this video from Wired, former Vice President Al Gore answers the most popular climate change questions searched on Google.

His new documentary, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, gives a status update on his original film, An Inconvenient Truth, from 11 years ago. As Gore discussed with Stephen Colbert last week, the need for a sequel does not mean a complete lack of progress on protecting the planet.

Read More Show Less
www.youtube.com

Kyara, a killer whale born at SeaWorld San Antonio just three months ago, died Monday at the park, as reported in this video from Newsy. Kyara is the last orca to be born in captivity under the SeaWorld breeding program, which shut down in 2016.

In a statement, SeaWorld said the cause of death was "likely pneumonia" and that "Kyara had faced some very serious and progressive health issues over the last week."

Read More Show Less
Trending
www.youtube.com

The colossal mass of throwaway plastic—from straws to bags to bottles—has grown much faster than recycling and disposal efforts can contain it. You might even say this is obvious, no matter where you look.

As a result, places that were once considered pristine—such as Antarctica and the ocean floors of Australia—have become inundated with plastic waste.

Check out this video from National Geographic to watch underwater photographer Huai Su film a diver collecting an endless amount of plastic bottles that litter the seafloor off Xiaoliuqiu Island, Taiwan.

www.youtube.com

It's a good year to be a Clemson Tigers football fan, but a bleak time to be an actual tiger in the wild. A loss of habitat and population has pushed tigers to the brink of extinction.

Clemson, and three other universities with tiger mascots—including Auburn, Louisiana State University and the University of Missouri—are teaming up to save the world's remaining tigers.

Check out the video above from Newsy to see how the U.S. Tiger University Consortium is taking on "a moral responsibility" to protect and double the tiger population by 2022.

After all, having an extinct species mascot would be nothing to cheer.

Trending
www.facebook.com

In this video posted to Facebook by Krystal Gamage, two fishermen off the coast of Owls Head, Maine, find a baby seal trapped in plastic fish netting. What happens next is worth watching until the end.

Even in the waters of the Antarctic, long thought to be pristine, plastic pollution has recently been measured at shockingly high levels.

Wouldn't it be great if every story about plastic pollution had a happy ending?

www.youtube.com

Coyote Peterson and the Brave Wilderness team take kayaks to an island off the coast of Maine, where an abandoned fortress from 1858 now displays a sign reading, "ENTER AT YOUR OWN RISK."

"There's always a chance that something interesting can be found," Peterson testifies as they approach Fort Gorges. Upon entering the huge castle, he exclaims, "It feels like Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom!"

Check out the video above, gone viral with more than 3.1 million views. Find out out what Peterson means when he observes, "It's like a whole ecosystem," and discover how you too can visit this wild place!

www.youtube.com

A golden retriever in China has been trained to remove plastic bottles from rivers. In the Jiangsu Province, this dog retrieves about 20 to 30 bottles each day, and has already removed more than 2,000.

According to the Guardian, Chinese consumers bought 73.8 billion bottles of water in 2016, China accounted for 28 percent of the global demand for polyethylene terephthalate bottles in 2015 and Chinese cities still lack recycling programs.

However, "some citizens are trying to turn the tide before too many people in China become accustomed to a throwaway culture."

Check out the amazing eco-pooch in the video above from Vocativ!